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  1. #1

    The Fragments that Formed Flair. Volume 6: The Dragon and the Peacock (Part 2).

    The Fragments that Formed Flair.
    Volume 6: The Dragon and the Peacock
    (Part 2).



    Saying goodbye to 1977



    Flair’s dual title reigns as the Mid Atlantic Tag champion and the NWA United States champion saw Steamboat on his trail on both fronts. And it didn’t take the Dragon long to make gain, for Steamboat and Paul Jones defeated Flair and Valentine for the Mid Atlantic Titles in August of 1977. It’s as if the new kid in school refused to be bullied and took a second Title from the jock to cement the fact. Though no footage of this exists, we’ve all seen enough Flair to know what he looks like when incensed and him having lost another Title to Steamboat wouldn’t have gone without his red face and his fuming. This brought Flair and Steamboat wrestling a Title versus Title match for Flair’s US gold and Steamboat’s TV. To make matters worse, Flair and Greg Valentine’s own partner, Blackjack Mulligan, teased a challenge for Flair’s US. Title, too.


    Flair’s expectation should be for all comers, because the US. Title stood as the greatest singles Title in the Mid Atlantic. Before Flair was ready for it, he and Johnny Valentine once took a plane together in October of 75. Being the US champion and the biggest heel in the territory, Johnny got dibs next to the pilot. After the plane crashed, in the rubble they dug up Johnny Valentine paralyzed and Flair with a broken back. Flair recovered; Johnny couldn’t. Two men in one plane set off to two very separate destinations.


    With Johnny retired, two years later, Flair held the coveted United States Championship, but in doing so he found himself in his comrade Blackjack Mulligan’s space. During the years between Johnny Valentine being stripped of the Title and Flair capturing it, Blackjack won the distinction multiple times, exchanging with, of course, the worshipped for no reason Paul Jones. It made sense for Blackjack to be in that role, since he’d been all over, from AWA to WWWF. The experienced Blackjack lost the title to the legendary Bobo, and Bobo to Flair.


    But, here, only a tease for a Blackjack and Flair match happened. That seemed to be the pattern from booker, George Scott. He’d tease a turn, let people forget about it for a while, and come back to it with the seed having been sown. It’s a little nuance that I love. In life, few things fall apart, all at once. Usually there’s a seed. It grows, and people blow up, and you see a side of them they didn’t even know they had. Jealousy grows with thinking and thinking and hate with multiple cutting experiences with someone or something. Scott worked these notions into his booking. There’s a patience, back then, that wrestlers and bookers obligated themselves to in order to present the realist matches; the realist emotions; and the realist, bloodiest aggressions.


    With the United States division stacked with contenders, Blackjack challenged the guy who beat Flair for the belt, rather than Flair. Because in October, Steamboat defeated Flair, taking Flair’s last three Titles, the TV, the Mid Atlantic Tag, and now the US. It’s fair to argue that, even, more than those against him and Valentine in the bone-breaking battles—the Andersons and Wahoo— Steamboat was now the rival Flair hated most.


    Only briefly would Flair’s naval show itself. Hence, this same month he dropped the US Belt, he and Valentine captured their second NWA World Tag Titles from the Andersons (documented in a previous column). Of course, the “blonde bombers” would be challenged, right away, by the team that beat them for the Mid Atlantic Tag Titles, Ricky Steamboat and Paul Jones. Those with memories of the Mid Atlantic hail these tag matches as marathons. There’d be Title for Title, NWA World Tag vs. Mid Atlantic Tag title bouts that went the sixty minutes. It’s said that sometimes Steamboat showed a more intense side of himself that Flair and Valentine didn’t know how to react to…


    Having followed Steamboat’s career and seen enough footage of his matches with Flair from this time, I will explain why the intensity, but let’s start with this—If Flair fought two antitheses of himself in his career, one would be Dusty, with emphasis on Flair’s materialism against Dusty’s cause for the common man; the other Steamboat. Before 1989, before their Steamboat’s-family-values-versus-Flair’s-worldly-living-feud, before even some of Flair’s spring and fall 1978 acts on Steamboat which will be documented later, Steamboat’s good hated Flair’s evil. Steamboat never turned heel! How many people can you say that about? Inside him, his character burned with righteous anger. In contrast, all Flair did represented selfishness. He’d turn on who he had to, he insulted the fans, he alongside Valentine broke men, all to please himself. Steamboat’s values versus Flair’s lack thereof steamed the boat they floated on in 1977 and into 1978. This, alone, was enough to reap righteous hot anger from Steamboat.




    Going full board into 1978, we say goodbye to 1977, which was Flair’s breakout year as the biggest star in the Mid Atlantic.
    Closing the chapter on this important year, it’s worth noting this was when Harley Race defeated Terry Funk to seal the deal as “the man” of the entire NWA. This was Harley’s second World Championship; his first since 73 when he beat Dory and transitioned it to Jack Brisco. But now, Harley truly wore the brass ring. The NWA ran with him, and from here until his matches with Flair in 1983, he set a tone as champion that would be difficult to overcome. On offense, he worked as a man with the life practice to improvise what a beating would look like on another man. It’s widely reported that he’s truly one of the toughest of all time. But his sell—Harley bumped million-dollar bumps, making the top guy in each territory look like they dished nothing but gold. If Harley punched a man, he’d dictate the man act like he truly was punched. On the other hand, Harley took throws from giants like Baba and flipped over the buckle. From the highest bumps to the simplest striking, all maneuvers carried consequences in his contests. It seemed the thought was always, “what if I really punched a man?” What would he do?” I saw Terry Funk get hit in the ear by Harley and turn groggy as if his equilibrium had been bounced out of whack! Harley’s brutality was ugly and beautiful and not a blow was taken for granted. In 1977, Harley began to set the standard that, in my opinion, Flair would have to surpass to become the greatest world champion. More on that, later in the series



    1978.



    In 1978, Flair and Valentine continued to run from Steamboat and Jones. Since the sixty-minute matches never settled the score with the bombers and Jones and Steamboat, the NWA signed a 90-minute time limit match in Richmond in March 1978. Flair pronounced, “We can wrestle for a half hour, we can wrestle for an hour, we can wrestle for two hours or we can wrestle for two days. You can ask the girls in that town, we don’t even get goin’ in 90 minutes, do you understand what I’m tellin’ you?!”


    Now, I’ve seen some Richmond women, and ninety minutes is an awful long time to get started. But for Flair being our hero, I will not suggest he and Valentine had erectile disfunction, and especially, I won’t, since they came out on top in this tag match. Still, sixty to ninety-minute matches must have been a building block for the younger Flair, Steamboat, and Valentine. I read in Steve Austin’s book how much betterment his ring work undertook when Steamboat had Austin and Pillman do marathons on the house shows against Steamboat and Douglas. I wonder if any of that school of thinking from Steamboat went back to the late seventies when he and Jones challenged the Blonde Bombers for those NWA titles. Certainly, Flair, Valentine, and Steamboat came out ok from the series of matches!


    Regardless of retaining the belts, the tactics Flair and Valentine resorted to brought Eddy Graham, as the NWA President, to strip Flair and Valentine of the NWA Titles. This meant the end of all their championship success as a tandem. Steamboat and Jones won the tournament to become the new NWA tag champions and fended off Flair and Greg’s attempts to win the belts back.


    The Blonde Bombers gradually grew apart, but their history is far from over. Valentine soon left for New York for a stint but would be back and doing his own figure four leg lock (which he learned there). In the meanwhile, Flair rekindled his United States Title magic.


    Steamboat had lost the US. Title to Blackjack. Blackjack dropped it to Tim Woods. If more footage from this time in Mid Atlantic survived, I’m sure we’d see Flair and Tim Woods wrestled enough to earn a chapter to themselves. Woods crashed in that plane with Flair and Johnny Valentine in 1975. According to Flair’s autobiography, ”to Be the Man,” to hide he was in the same crash as Flair, which would be a heel and baby face in a plane together, “Mr. Wrestling,” took advantage of the fact that on TV he wore a mask by pretending in the hospital to be a promoter. Furthermore, he left the hospital the next day to go back to the Mid Atlantic in Charlotte. Two weeks later, not even recovered, he wrestled Superstar Billy Graham. When you look back on it, what was he protecting? Was he crazy? Not to me. To me, the effective story-telling that is kayfabe was worth it. And, yeah, now we all know magic’s not real, but it wouldn’t hurt for more wrestlers to act like it was, in order to for fans to suspend disbelief. When Flair went back to the ring in 1976, they put him against Woods over and over, so he overcame his instincts given by trauma to not back bump.


    And in April 1978, Flair found himself opposite Mr. Wrestling for the United States Title. In the encounter, two men who came back from the crash fought for the Title of the man who was paralyzed by it. Having not seen much Mr. Wrestling, unless he was one hell of a wrestler, I assure you the right man, Ric Flair, won this match. This positioned Flair, again, where he belonged as the top singles heel in the territory!


    To solidify himself as the alpha-heel, the same month he won the gold, he challenged his greatest nemesis, Steamboat. When Steamboat emerged to ringside to accept, it turned out he’d been suckered in for a brutalization. The Naitch roughed up the Dragon’s face, rubbing it in concrete. He busted him up the hard way in a famous scene that set up their next series of matches. This guaranteed a visual to strengthen the emotion in their battles. Every time the audience cringed at the scar-face of Steamboat, they’d be reminded of how wronged he’d been, how deserving of pay back Flair was. In Flair’s book, he and Steamboat testify that after the match Steamboat endured more punishment to ensure the wound would remain. Harley helped in wanting to punch Steamboat hard in the face, himself, but they went with scraping the Dragon’s face with sandpaper, instead. Despite being the pretty face, the moral compass, the white meat his entire career, Steamboat took sandpaper to the face to set this feud with Flair ablaze! This tells me Steamboat was tough; this tells me Steamboat loved wrestling. They fought the rest of the year with Steamboat having more and more righteous anger to take out on Flair!


    Most remember when Steamboat stripped Flair of his tuxedo in 1989. This happened in November of 1978, first. Flair brought out a woman on both arms, one being Steamboat’s future wife seen in the 1989 feud, and Steamboat couldn’t take Flair’s berating of him. He beat Flair to a pulp and stripped his clothes. The intensity between the two turned itself up to eleven, again and again. To see how the two memorable moments played into their matches, it’s worth dissecting this match between the two from November 1978.



    The video opens with Flair rubbing his elbow into the face of Steamboat, which still looks battered. In November, Steamboat still hadn’t healed from Flair’s assault. Flair’s hatred shows in how he targets the very visage of his adversary, not to just hurt him but to strip him of his dignity. Steamboat answers with both hands as he wraps them around Flair’s throat. When the referee steps in, Steamboat, with anger on his wounded countenance, points at the sore spot, showing just one reason he hates the man he wrestles.


    The referee distracting Steamboat allows Flair some recovery from the choking and chopping. Flair gives a cheap shot to the gut which drops Steamboat to the mat. Having learned nothing from Steamboat’s choking, he goes back to the face, grinding it with his knee. He goes from face to gut and back to face, this time with his knee drop. Steamboat rises like his injury is on fire!


    To all whoever thought Steamboat should turn heel. Why? Why does a man who can get sympathy in his every motion need to do something to ruin it all? If a wrestler does one role his entire career, is there more integrity to his character? Is there truer good to his goodness? For the iota of a heel he could’ve been, he was much more the babyface for never having turned.


    Flair works the face, until Steamboat again gets both hands around Flair’s neck. Flair rakes the face, and Steamboat must be reminding himself of how the sandpaper felt, because in his selling, you can’t only see he’s in pain, but you can detect the exact pain he’s in. Anyone with ever an open wound imagines the rubbing against it, the burning. And anyone who’s ever been angry feels their blood pressure rising with Steamboat’s indignation. They’re angry, alongside of him!


    Flair having seared Ricky’s face, sees his opponent is where he wants him. He drops an elbow, and how about this? He goes for the three. Moves matter. When a man has a man down with a crushing blow, why not try to pin him? The little things that make some wrestlers better might just be them trying to convince the audience it’s for real.


    Steamboat, however, won’t stay down. His offenses are bursts of energy but are halted by an official getting in the way, a cheap shot from Flair, or his own fury getting the better of him. He’s swinging hard but missing the ball yet showing enough rage in the swing that fans can’t wait to see what happens when he lands a hit—what happens when he gets his hands around Flair’s throat! At one point, in between Flair working the arm of Steamboat, Steamboat gets a brief take down, resulting in the two throwing punches all over the mat. In their rolling about, you can almost see a heap of dirt go in the air. Hate has manifested itself in the physical form! Still, Flair comes up on top. At this point, it’s wondered how the Dragon will ever come back!


    By now, it’s worth mentioning there’s two referees to keep charge, one on the inside and another, in a red jacket, on the outside. The guest outside official looks to be a wrestler, though I can’t make out who. He’s a babyface, though, constantly calling Flair out for using ropes, pulling hair, and taking cheap shots.


    Flair continues the cheap shots, doing a viscous kick into Steamboat’s gut while the Dragon is down. There’s something vile about Flair doing that kick. It’s as if every time in this era I see him do it, he’s flaunting how dirty he fights. Somehow, Flair’s scoundrel ways ooze off him when he scowls, screams, and methodically kicks a man when he’s down. Such a simple move, but he works it, perfectly!


    It’s when Flair goes for the atomic drop that Steamboat’s able to land some ahead of the knee, get behind Flair, and hit a back-body drop. This reversal I saw Flair do from a match earlier in the same year with Jumbo Tsuruta. It must be a spot he called with smaller babyfaces, but it’s good looking as it takes the mind a second to register the atomic drop was blocked and right when it takes it in, the reversal happens.


    Unlike Tsuruta, Steamboat doesn’t go for a win. Instead he goes after Flair’s head, giving him those vertical Wahoo chops in a ground and pound position! It’s now Flair’s face that’s a crimson mask, pouring out eye for eye, red justice. Steamboat targets Flair’s mug over and over with brutal chops, while the fans scream like Romans at a crucifixion. Flair goes for the gut, but Steamboat blocks. The cheap shot well seems to have run dry for the Nature Boy. Then, Flair’s thrown into the turn buckle and turns upside down from the impact. As Flair hangs upside down and Steamboat lays the chops into him, even the cursed tree must be unsettled by the woe that comes next. Steamboat sinks his teeth into the wound of Flair and shreds his face, while the Nature Boy is dangling like a criminal!


    The fans spill out of the crowd while a voice on the intercom tells them to return to their seats, and security holds them back. Finally, Steamboat rubs Flair’s own wound into the canvas. He double thrusts Flair and goes for a high-risk splash to seemingly end it, but Flair’s able to move out the way.


    Flair, a bloody mess, stalks Steamboat like an antagonist that just won’t die in a movie’s last battle, but Steamboat does a sort of Thetz Press with teeth. He’s eating Flair’s head. He’s an abused animal finally retaliating. He’s possessed! He’s rabid!


    At this point, all Flair seeks to do is escape. With every cheap shot he can get on Steamboat, he crawls towards the outside of the ring. However, he’s thwarted by Steamboat grabbing his trunks. It’s more a bull holding a man than a man grabbing the horns of a bull. The dangerous beast only needs a good pull to destroy the man, but alas, Flair escapes to the floor. Then, he runs! Steamboat’s awarded the count out win, as his face tells the story of man who has realized he completely lost himself!





    While Flair got away in this one, Steamboat, one month later, got full revenge, defeating Flair and expediting yet another Title from him. The feud went into 1979, when in April, Flair regained the US Title from Steamboat. After Ricky beat him for the TV Title, the Mid Atlantic Tag Title, and two US Titles, in April Flair finally defeated the Dragon for a Title in a steel cage and was able to ward the Dragon off the remainder of the feud.


    I tried counting the matches, adding singles and tag, Flair and Steamboat fought between 1977 and 1979 and decided to give up when I got to one-hundred-fifty! Most of these went over thirty minutes and many over sixty minutes. How much does a man learn when he puts what he’s taught to practice? All Gagne, Wahoo, the Andersons, Johnny Valentine and more taught Flair— in this feud with Steamboat, how much more could Naitch have put it to practice? Over one hundred and fifty matches in the same territory and you can see even by November 1978 how hot the crowd burned for Steamboat getting his justice!


    Having studied this first feud and watched a lot of footage of their early bouts, it’s hard not to compare it to their 1989 classics. So, I will say, I do prefer the later matches. Flair’s in good shape by this time, but in the mid to late 80’s he’s in the best shape of his career. Both Flair and Steamboat mature, and there’s more elements in the later feud that naturally come with time. For one, their fighting for the biggest prize in the business, the NWA World Title. For two, Steamboat’s wife and son add even more contrasts to their personalities. If ever there were birds of different feathers, it’d be the Dragon and the peacock, and the Dragon’s child and baby set them apart it to their furthest degrees.


    But what I will say about this early feud was it was completely different than the later one. It was a blood feud and a damn good one. Kudos to George Scott, Flair, and Steamboat for all they put into this first war, and for going with their present situation later, rather than redoing this brilliance. For there’s no remaking their mojo in the late 1970s! Truly, this feud is a classic unto itself!



    Flair's first feud with Steamboat has been attained!



    We’ve attained Flair’s early stages of in-ring greatness, as a heel! But there’s, still, one more column to attain fragments from his first heel run. We must go back to 1978 one more time, for if a man draws a Blackjack card, he’s got to play the hand given to him!


    Then after, we will attain the origins of Flair’s other side! After all, in 1993 when he, as a good guy, wrestled Vader—that’s when he first won me over as a fan! What did Flair attain in his first ever babyface run to be able to later become that good guy? We’ll find out, as we search our engines for more of those fragments!

  2. #2
    The Brain
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    My favorite series going right now, incredible chapter!

    Tremendously pleased at the way you've unearthed the nuances of George Scott as a promoter. Truly, I barely even knew the name, but you've made me a big fan!

    Curious also about Paul Jones, whom you don't seem to care to. I knew someone (Rob/TripleR, I think?) who praised the man, having seen him first hand. He and his army are still known, at least to a few!

    What a worthy look at Steamboat, perhaps the best feature of the column. The man burned, he burned! He was righteous! I will only say though, I did see some possibilities in a heel turn late in his career. As we know from Bret Hart, righteousness is only a breath away from self-righteousness. Look to how he once fought Flair with his toddler son still in the ring, choosing to vent his anger rather than attend to his family's safety! Look to how he shamed Stunning Steve Austin's ambition and sought to hold him down! Look at how he could not exist in lethal lottery, costing himself the winner's purse in exchange for exacting his moral outrage on any he deemed unfit! Steamboat's rage could be overwhelming, and his constant assurance that he was in the right could have become a millstone in time.

    Wonderful praise for Harley Race as well, and timely since the legend has so recently passed. All should recognize and respect the greatest of Harley!

    And what a story for Tim Woods, to get in the ring again so close to his terrible injury. I respect him for his grit and determination, but perhaps it casts a shadow on the old timers of today who scold the youth for the risks they take?

    Incredible detail that Steamboat's wife was once a valet for Flair. Only in wrestling! It still turns my mind that Flair's current wife is Fifi the maid, of his 1993 run.

    Love the attention to detail in the matches, that stuff matters so much to me. One of the reasons I love wrestling of this era, everything that happens means something to the match!

    And lastly, you touch on Jumbo Tsuruta here... I hope there is a chapter, or at least a subsection, devoted to Flair's interaction with that great legend!

    As for the match, I'll put it right on my list to watch. I did watch the match where Steamboat first beats Flair and I loved it, with Valentine's disbelieving commentary every time Steamboat surpasses his expectations, with the red hot crowd hanging on every move and all the seeds of their future fights being planted... awesome stuff!

    Can't wait for the next one, Benny!
    Last edited by mizfan; 08-21-2019 at 12:20 PM.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by mizfan View Post
    My favorite series going right now, incredible chapter!

    Tremendously pleased at the way you've unearthed the nuances of George Scott as a promoter. Truly, I barely even knew the name, but you've made me a big fan!

    Curious also about Paul Jones, whom you don't seem to care to. I knew someone (Rob/TripleR, I think?) who praised the man, having seen him first hand. He and his army are still known, at least to a few!

    What a worthy look at Steamboat, perhaps the best feature of the column. The man burned, he burned! He was righteous! I will only say though, I did see some possibilities in a heel turn late in his career. As we know from Bret Hart, righteousness is only a breath away from self-righteousness. Look to how he once fought Flair with his toddler son still in the ring, choosing to vent his anger rather than attend to his family's safety! Look to how he shamed Stunning Steve Austin's ambition and sought to hold him down! Look at how he could not exist in lethal lottery, costing himself the winner's purse in exchange for exacting his moral outrage on any he deemed unfit! Steamboat's rage could be overwhelming, and his constant assurance that he was in the right could have become a millstone in time.

    Wonderful praise for Harley Race as well, and timely since the legend has so recently passed. All should recognize and respect the greatest of Harley!

    And what a story for Tim Woods, to get in the ring again so close to his terrible injury. I respect him for his grit and determination, but perhaps it casts a shadow on the old timers of today who scold the youth for the risks they take?

    Incredible detail that Steamboat's wife was once a valet for Flair. Only in wrestling! It still turns my mind that Flair's current wife is Fifi the maid, of his 1993 run.

    Love the attention to detail in the matches, that stuff matters so much to me. One of the reasons I love wrestling of this era, everything that happens means something to the match!

    And lastly, you touch on Jumbo Tsuruta here... I hope there is a chapter, or at least a subsection, devoted to Flair's interaction with that great legend!

    As for the match, I'll put it right on my list to watch. I did watch the match where Steamboat first beats Flair and I loved it, with Valentine's disbelieving commentary every time Steamboat surpasses his expectations, with the red hot crowd hanging on every move and all the seeds of their future fights being planted... awesome stuff!

    Can't wait for the next one, Benny!
    Hey, thanks for the kind words and feedback!

    George Scott's a name thats come up a lot over the years. I read good stuff from those who worked with him in the 70s. Seemed, like every great mind in the territories who tried their hand at WCW, he didnt do so well at WCW..I think the old timers had great creative minds but not the vision for the national expansion, and Turner execs didnt give them the vision either. Hands off bunch. Wheras, Crocket knew the business side of his territory while George Scott knew how to book wrestling.

    Paul Jones was a heel manager in the 1980s with his cane and such...I like some of what he did there but hated the boogy woogy man, his rival. When he was a baby face wrestler I find him really bland next to some great personalities but he's in the thick of everything, it seems. And he's always winning titles...had over 20 mid atlantic titles in his day and I dont find him on par with flair, wahoo, steamboat, the andersons, johhny valentine, greg valentine, mulligan...those are a colorful, solid bunch. But he's everywhere. Someone liked him, back then.

    As for Steamboat, maybe a heel turn at just the right time would work. The mid-late nineties were a good time for that and Bret Hart is definitely the model. If he and the creative department could create that level of intensity, it could work. I definitely see the side of him...could of been risky and if it didnt work it would really have weakened him...a lot of WCW heel turns didn't go so well.

    His fueds with Austin has a lot of parrelells with his early fued with Flair, as they wrestled for the TV, World Tag, and US titles.

    Harley Race was an amazing World Champion. Strongly recommend aeveryone to do a little Race binging...Great stuff out there. Im not done with my Race binging myself...Great, great wrestler and represents what I love most about wredtling.

    Definitely cant say the old timers are apt to be ministers on safety. I did a column once with an old wrestler, young wrestler dialogue but wasnt much conversation going on, as I dont think generations listen and learn from each other very easily. I will say, though, that I think it's higher risks without the logic and pay offs that gives some of it a bad name, but high risks used well can definitely add to excitement of a match.

    I thought it was awesome when I read Flair married fifi. Its like shes giving yet another spice to yet another of his old ages. They missed the boat by NOT playing Steamboat's wife's past relationship with Flair into a storyline...but I dont suppose you could get much better than what they did in 89.

    There's something about weaving story into the matches that makes for brilliant wrestling psychology. It's something I still appreciate today when I see it done.

    I will definitely do a spin off thread with Jumbo Tsuruta, the andersons, johhny valentine and others who've Ive learned more about or discovered on the journey!

    Thanks again for the wondetful feedback...I could talk about this stuff with you all day long!


    Edit: Here's a recent promo I just saw from Flair now.

    https://youtu.be/JC5V-UOMpYw

    He talks about where he started, Wahoo who Ive covered, Steamboat, who I just covered, and Blackjack Mulligan, who I will cover in my next column.
    Last edited by Benjamin Button; 08-24-2019 at 10:35 AM.

  4. #4
    Good column. I understood the story Steamboat and Flair were telling in that match. I can only imagine how painful it felt for Steamboat to rub sandpaper on his open wound.

    Wrestlers really did go to great lengths back then to protect kayfabe. You're right, magic isn't real but it would be better if more wrestlers acted like it was.

  5. #5
    I think thats what amazes me. Steamboat's not one to boast of a lot...but he's got to be a tough cat who loves wrestling to do that. They really worked it in the matches well.
    See the latest of my Ric Flair saga click here. http://lordsofpain.tv/showthread.php...acock-(Part-2) View my story inspired by colorful wrestlers I've come across in my fandom. http://lordsofpain.tv/showthread.php...-the-Challenge

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    To think, if Flair was sitting next to that pilot he would have been the one paralyzed. He would have never become the legend that he is today. It's funny how life works out.

    Throughout the years, from what I've read, I always assumed that Dusty Rhodes was Flair's greatest rival. But from reading the Dragon and The Peacock I'd say that it would appear that Steamboat is the one who was Flair's greatest rival.

    I love your point about Steamboat never turning face. That truly does mean the definition of a babyface. Never becoming a bad guy shows that his good morals stood tall above all his heelish desires, something that even the most good have inside if them. That is the definition of an ultimate babyface.

    I've read the entire series thus far and it's been brilliant!

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