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  1. #1

    Wrestling Books You've Read

    What wrestling books have you guys read? I own a copy of Capitol Revolution by wrestling historian Tim Hornbaker and I have to finish Slobberknocker, Jim Ross' autobiography. Next I plan to get Hornbaker's National Wrestling Alliance as well as some other wrestling personalities books. I definitely recommend Capitol if you want to learn the early history of WWE as it goes from the beginnings of the company as Capitol Wrestling Corporation to Vince Jr.'s purchasing of the WWF in the early '80s.

    Twitter: @libsuperstar

  2. #2
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Won't give the full list tonight as it's reasonably long but I've read that NWA book.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  3. #3
    Member #25 SirSam's Avatar
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    The best ones I've read are the Jericho & Mic Foley ones. Most wrestling books are written far too simply for my liking.

    One I would actually suggest if you haven't is 'Plan's book. Believe it or not that guy can write! What he lays out there really informed how I watch wrestling, Doc's book is a pretty fun read too.

    If anyone could recommend a good wrestling history book for the 80s or early 90s that would be quite cool, I don't know a whole lot about the eras and quite honestly don't know where to start. Maybe the NWA book you guys are talking about would do that?

  4. #4
    Puerto Rican dude living in Japan Degenerate's Avatar
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    I've read a ton of them so I won't list them all. I can't recall a single wrestling-related book that I've read that I disliked a lot. As a long time wrestling fan I think I'll always find something enjoyable in all of them.

    Some of the least-talked about ones that I enjoyed a lot were the bios of Terry Funk and Bob Holly. I'd recommend those for anyone who was a fan of them.

    One book that pleasantly surprised me a lot was Bret Hart's book. There's a lot of bitterness since it was written before his reconciliation with a lot of people in the industry, but the writing felt very real to me. He was extremely candid with his thoughts, especially in moments he screwed up big time. It was refreshing to see that type of honesty in a wrestling book, where people either omit or gloss over the bad stuff. It's a long read but worth it, one of my favorites.

    On a side note, I've seen a lot of amazing-looking books about All Japan and New Japan at bookstores here in Japan. Unfortunately, with my level of Japanese I'd probably have to spend a solid year reading and translating what I don't understand so I haven't picked any of them up yet. I will some day, for sure.
    Last edited by Degenerate; 05-12-2018 at 03:57 AM.

  5. #5
    Author of 101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die Samuel 'Plan's Avatar
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    Bret Hart's is about the best that I've read, mainly because it wasn't associated with WWE so you could take it with a little less pinch of salt.

    That said, in all honesty I don't see that many on the bookshelves without a WWE brand on. Do people mostly get them online? It seems like I see the same two or three in every bookshop, which is disappointing for an old school book shopper like myself.

    Oh and thanks for the plug Sam! Though if anyone does read mine, I apologise for the punctuation errors. And slightly uneven tone.

  6. #6
    Foley and Jericho's books get good reviews from what I've been seeing. Gotta check out these books you guys are recommending.

    Quote Originally Posted by Prime Time
    Won't give the full list tonight as it's reasonably long but I've read that NWA book.
    How did you like it?

    Twitter: @libsuperstar

  7. #7
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    I liked it well. It's very much a history book though so to a general audience it might seem a bit dry, but if you're dedicated in your interest to the period it's pretty fascinating in places. As someone who is broadly a fan of the NWA idea I sometimes find it a bit hostile, but I guess that just means I've got to own that the idea comes with drawbacks as well as benefits... as should be obvious, really.
    Last edited by Prime Time; 05-30-2018 at 08:07 AM.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  8. #8
    I feel like I should re-read Heenan's books now he's no longer with us...

  9. #9
    The Brain
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    I read one of them and was kind of let down, honestly. He seemed like he was trying to write comically but it didn't seem to have the same energy. Maybe I should give it another look sometime though.

  10. #10
    Senior Member 205 Clive's Avatar
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    I'll be starting Bret Hart's book in a couple days. It will actually be my first foray into the world of wrestlers' biographies. Looking forward to it.

  11. #11
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    OK so, more full list...

    As well as the stuff mentioned here:

    Foley x 3
    Jericho x 2
    Heenan x2
    Piper
    Hogan
    Angle
    Goldberg
    Lawler
    Bischoff
    Flair
    HBK

    Where they've done several, it's usually the whichever is first in chronological order.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  12. #12
    The Brain
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    What'd you think of the Heenan books, Pete?

  13. #13
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    Bret Hart is my favourite (signed by the man himself!) however I feel, as mentioned earlier, that there is a lot of bitterness there, which may have clouded some facts.

    Other than that, Jericho's first two were entertaining and also The Rise and Fall of WCW. Again, some of it is taken with a pinch of salt, but a really interesting timeline of all things WCW.


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  14. #14
    People either love me, hate me, or they don't care CanadianCrippler's Avatar
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    Around 2002 my dad bought me 2 books on pro wrestling just before i had began to watch regularly. Only reason he did was because of how much I loved playing No mercy on N64. One was a a guide to WCW for children made in the year 2000. It breaks down all the "stars" of WCW at the time, lists accolades, finishers, weight and career highlights. Also churched up WCW's dumb gimmick matches like triple cage and the Asylum. I wonder if it's worth any money?

    The second book was a 3 quarters white, 1/4 purple bottom hard cover large picture book from WOW! World of Wrestling made in 2000 featuring pictures of every WWF, WCW & ECW talent also with wikipedia style info, accolades and highlights. Tells behind the scenes stories of Jim Duggan's career up to beating cancer and returning, the rise of Rock, Mick Foley and Stone Cold, an Interview with Hogan & Goldberg, honoring Owen Hart and Rick Rude and a career retrospective on Chris Benoit from Stampede to Japan to ECW to WCW.

    Thus far technically the only two wrestling books Ive ever read other than some PWI Almanacs from '05, '06, '07.

    Any recommendations for a good book about a wrestler, autobiography or something about pro wrestling?

  15. #15
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mizfan View Post
    What'd you think of the Heenan books, Pete?
    I liked them, but with a couple of notes. The problem is Bobby is a contender for the best performer in wrestling history and the books just aren't at the level you might hope coming in, for various reasons. But once you get past that, I like them fine.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  16. #16
    I really liked the Missy Hyatte one. She really took a lot of the wrestlers best finishes.

  17. #17
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    I forgot to add to the list above, I did also read Triple H's weird autobiography-cum-workout book.

    Funny that people have mentioned Bret's book being bitter, and of course it is but I felt that it was still essentially accurate (the occasional detail may have gone wrong over time but most of it is verifiable by other sources). The one that struck me as bitter to the point it clouded facts was Flair's. That man had a major chip on his shoulder at the time and it really comes through in that book.

    I'd actually read Michaels' book after the whole 2010 thing and the documentary he did with Bret had come out, and y'know, the amount of stuff he contradicts from that book subsequently is staggering.

    I think the sleeper here in quality terms is probably Bischoff's, which is better written than the average ghost-written affair, but that'll be in part because he's fairly unpopular and a lot of people have trust issues when it comes to Easy E. Definitely one to approach with your guard up a little, but if you can do that it's a good read.



    Has anyone read Regal's? That's the big WWE book that'd interest me that I never got around to buying. I saw a copy on the cheap when I was not watching and didn't buy it, and have never seen it at that price again, and y'know, I regret it to this day. Anyone know the Blassie book, either?

    I'd also be interested in tracking down a copy of the Thesz book, or looking into Chris Charlton's book on NJPW.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  18. #18
    I read Heenan's again, and what is missing is the huge, detailed account of his career. They've concentrated on getting some of his tone down and that half works but I if there's something disappointing about it then it's that it barely scratches the surface of his career

  19. #19
    The Brain
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    Agreed, I was disappointed in Heenan's books. It had some fun bits but didn't really capture what made his special as a character and performer or give any really good insights into his life or career.

  20. #20
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prime Time View Post


    Has anyone read Regal's? That's the big WWE book that'd interest me that I never got around to buying. I saw a copy on the cheap when I was not watching and didn't buy it, and have never seen it at that price again, and y'know, I regret it to this day. Anyone know the Blassie book, either?

    I'd also be interested in tracking down a copy of the Thesz book, or looking into Chris Charlton's book on NJPW.
    Regals book is great. Very raw and honest about his addiction stuff. Staggering that he's still alive.

  21. #21
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info. Might look into that one then.

    I think I agree with the point being made about Heenan's, if the thing to take away is that there's nothing wrong with it except for the fact that it's just not the book that it could have been.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  22. #22
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Sorry for the double post, but just occurred to me, given all this AEW stuff that's going on and his role in it the fifth Jericho book could actually end up being very interesting, if it ever happens.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  23. #23
    No reason it won't happen, people will want to know the story and a publisher will pay a bomb for it

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