Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 8910
Results 361 to 372 of 372
  1. #361
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    158
    Any thoughts on the supposed rumor (that came from Meltzer, so who the F knows) that NXT might move to FS1 in the same time slot as AEW's show on TNT?

    As much as I prefer NXT, I think the viewership for TNT over FS1 will mean AEW will win the ratings battle overall. Even if Raw and Smackdown do a better job cross promoting NXT on Fox's sister network.

    That said, I don't think it's a bad idea. Even if the ratio is 2:1 for viewers of AEW to NXT, I would say that's impressive for the 3rd brand. I also think it will take a chunk out of AEW's potential viewership. Not a whole bunch, but I've long believed NXT is not only developmental, but a brand purposely aimed towards the workrate/indy audience that AEW is also aiming for. There will be fans who will choose NXT over AEW despite knowing of both.

  2. #362
    I think itís a great idea to put it on FS1 and Iíd hope it would also stay on the network. Thatís the only reason I subscribe.

    Itís so hard to predict AEW ratings. Is there awareness among casual WWE fans? I have no clue.

  3. #363
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    158
    Quote Originally Posted by comfortablynumb View Post
    It’s so hard to predict AEW ratings. Is there awareness among casual WWE fans? I have no clue.
    Big Dave claims there's almost no crossover viewers from WWE, insinuating that AEW's current audience are mostly lapsed WWE fans.

  4. #364
    Super Moderator Team Farrell's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    469
    How is Meltzer figuring that out? What metrics is he using to figure out that these aren't crossover fans? Is he talking about AEW's audience being compiled mainly of the million or so person drop in Raw's viewership over the last 18 months? Is he trying to imply that he has some sort of reasonable way to discover that it's people who haven't watched wrestling in 18 years since WCW closed down?

    I saw that stated, but I don't understand for the life of me how he'd have figured that out. Neilson box number? Surely those have turnover.

  5. #365
    I don't think Meltzer's opinion should be anything to go by. While he may be right that the numbers won't be too high in the beginning, if the WWE doesn't change for the better, viewers will start looking for alternatives and flock to AEW. Whether AEW grows mainstream, depends entirely on on how WWE handles things from here on out.

    Also, Bishoff not having creative control over smackdown (from what is reported) is a bummer. I wanted to see if his creative control could have changed things around.

  6. #366
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    158
    Quote Originally Posted by Team Farrell View Post
    How is Meltzer figuring that out? What metrics is he using to figure out that these aren't crossover fans? Is he talking about AEW's audience being compiled mainly of the million or so person drop in Raw's viewership over the last 18 months? Is he trying to imply that he has some sort of reasonable way to discover that it's people who haven't watched wrestling in 18 years since WCW closed down?

    I saw that stated, but I don't understand for the life of me how he'd have figured that out. Neilson box number? Surely those have turnover.
    It's all been based on PPV and stream buys. Comparing those who ordered the 3 AEW shows to those who ordered WWE PPV shows. I'm not sure exactly how it works, or how legit it is. In fact, I share the same doubts as you. But it's not based on TV ratings.

    Quote Originally Posted by LifeLostInRewind View Post
    I don't think Meltzer's opinion should be anything to go by. While he may be right that the numbers won't be too high in the beginning, if the WWE doesn't change for the better, viewers will start looking for alternatives and flock to AEW. Whether AEW grows mainstream, depends entirely on on how WWE handles things from here on out.

    Also, Bishoff not having creative control over smackdown (from what is reported) is a bummer. I wanted to see if his creative control could have changed things around.
    I honestly don't think WWE will lose people to AEW that directly. I'm not saying no one will switch from one to the other. But it really depends on AEW branding. This isn't an argument that WWE is cool, but to the people who feel it is cool, they'll need to feel AEW is just as cool. I'm thinking kids mostly. For a teen of 13 years old to turn off Raw and SD, but turn on AEW on TNT, it'll have to feel like a trendy in some way. Kids are weird like that. Adults have the same mentality, but obviously not as common or obvious.

  7. #367
    Super Moderator Team Farrell's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    469
    I'm just confused about how he's getting that data. Like, I can't imagine that cable companies are super forthcoming with that information and if we're talking traditional PPV buys, then WWE is naturally going to be very low considering The Network.

    If he's talking digital, again I'm not sure how forthcoming WWE or B/R would be with that type of information due to privacy issues. Short of comparing the IP addresses of people subscribed to the WWE Network with those who have been watching AEW shows on B/R I'm not sure how you'd quantify that information, and either company handing out that information would be a major data breach.

    Maybe they've been willing to give up some very general geographic information about viewership and there's not a lot of overlap between the two?

    I mean, I'd assume he'd be looking at some sort of actual data and not just "connecting dots", going off of a gut feeling or comparing, say, who's following AEW's official Twitter account vs who's following WWE's.

    I hope there's some actual data, though. Because Cody brought it up in last week's post event press conference and if they're using that for planning purposes, I hope that it's right. Again, they can get all sorts of info from B/R I'd imagine, but I don't think WWE is giving them anything.

  8. #368
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    158
    Honestly, I don't believe a word of it. This isn't to say lapsed fans aren't the biggest AEW supporters, I just don't think there's anyway to actually back that up with any proof.

  9. #369
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    495
    Quote Originally Posted by PEN15v2 View Post
    I honestly don't think WWE will lose people to AEW that directly. I'm not saying no one will switch from one to the other. But it really depends on AEW branding. This isn't an argument that WWE is cool, but to the people who feel it is cool, they'll need to feel AEW is just as cool. I'm thinking kids mostly. For a teen of 13 years old to turn off Raw and SD, but turn on AEW on TNT, it'll have to feel like a trendy in some way. Kids are weird like that. Adults have the same mentality, but obviously not as common or obvious.
    This is an important thing in general because last I heard WWE was having a lot of trouble drawing fans 13-19. That's part of why Ricochet was supposed to be getting a huge push; they thought that his style would appear to teenagers and fans within the 18-34 demographic. These days the main fan base, outside of hardcores, seems to be either kids who have their parents take them or people in the 35-50 range; pretty much the antithesis of being cool. It's going to be vital to both WWE and AEW to get the teenagers and 18-34 crowd, and I anticipate, if there is competition, that that will be where they both focus their efforts on.

    As for the "AEW drawing the lapsed fans" data, that mostly has to do with Double or Nothing. I don't have the Observer issue in front of me so I'll probably miss something, but as Pen said the starting point was the number of PPV buys/subscriptions for B/R Live for the show. From there he then compared that data to the available data for WWE PPV buys, Impact PPV buys, ROH PPV buys, New Japan World subscriptions, Honor Club subscriptions and so on and so forth; I can't swear on this but I believe the only data he didn't have was the Network subscriptions. Based on the info he had it showed very little crossover with the AEW to any of the others; WWE obviously had the highest and the number likely would be higher with the Network numbers, but it apparently still was lower than expected, while the others weren't even close. So that's how they got it. I'd guess there probably is a little more crossover from WWE fans when you include whatever the Network data may be but I wouldn't be surprised if the show did draw significant numbers of lapsed fans. Technically speaking I'm one of those; I don't have the Network, I haven't had my New Japan subscription for months and the only shows I've paid to watch recently were CMLL and AAA shows. With the way RAW and Smackdown ratings have gone down and the way the Network has stalled in growth, I wouldn't doubt that a lot of people who stopped watching WWE in the last few years did give Double or Nothing a shot. The question is will they stay and will they grow.


  10. #370
    Super Moderator Team Farrell's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    469
    But that's my confusion, though. Is he just using viewership numbers, deciding that AEW is so much bigger than everyone else therefore must be drawing a large number of lapsed fans?

    Is he looking at it and saying Double or Nothing had X viewers on B/R live and Y purchases on Pay Per View.
    ROH has a total of (X-10,000) between Honour Club of FITE, and (Y-1,000) on Pay Per View.
    WWE averages (X+800,000) subscribers on the WWE Network and (Y-1,000) buys on Pay Per View.

    And drawing a conclusion from there?

    Is he looking at data and saying "The average age of a WWE viewer according to someone is X whereas the average viewer for DON was Y, therefore not much overlap"? Is he looking at geographic trends and saying that "WWE has seen a large decline in audience in Atlanta, but Double or Nothing had a particularly large viewership in that city"?

    I'm just curious more than anything about just what statistics he's using, and how he's gathered them. I mean, if you don't have really reliable data from the WWE Network outside of average subscription rates put out quarterly, it's pretty hard to draw actual conclusions.

    Anecdotally it makes a lot of sense, but anecdotally I also still believe that WWE's audience isn't hasn't bottomed out as much as ratings stats would lead you to believe when you consider that I haven't had cable in half a decade, don't know many people my age that still do, and have watched Raw and Smackdown almost exclusively via illegal streaming for that entire period.

  11. #371
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    495
    He's using stats provided to him by the PPV companies, B/R Live and the streaming services that give him information, which would be Ring of Honor and New Japan World. In other words, pretty much the same way he's always gotten the information, up until the WWE launched the Network and generally kept the viewership for their shows on the down low (as best I can tell, I've never seen anyone report actual numbers WWE shows do on the Network, just merely what was the most watched). As I understand it the PPV companies, B/R Live and the streaming services provided Meltzer with the number of buyrates, geographical trends and the works, and from there he was able to deduce how much crossover there was from PPV buys/subscriptions from other places; the only thing he wasn't able to do it with was obviously the Network, so the crossover between WWE fans that watched AEW would obviously be higher. Even still, it was very much clear there was little crossover between those who watched AEW and those who watched ROH, Impact and New Japan, which is definitely interesting because a) those fan bases are made up of the type of fans that you'd think would watch everything (including AEW) and b) The Elite guys just came from New Japan and ROH. And the crossover numbers with WWE PPV buys and such were so low that unless more than 50% of Network subscribers watched Double or Nothing, the crossover wasn't that big either.

    I can't say for sure how many people have stopped watching WWE but there is no doubt that a lot of people have stopped watching. Just like you know people who cut cable and watch RAW through other means Coach, I know people who stopped watching RAW altogether, canceled the Network and went right over to AEW. Maybe the audience has cratered the way ratings have suggested but there are definitely fewer people watching the show. I don't think it's out of the realm of question to think that a lot of fans who stopped watching saw that a new promotion, backed by a well known NFL owner, was starting up and decided to give it a shot. I also wouldn't discount, even after so many years, that some people that stopped watching after WCW died decided to give it a shot based on the TNT connection, among other things. All I can tell you is, based on the info out there, a decent amount of people who hadn't been watching other promotions bought this show. Why they did no one knows and whether they'll continue to do so or not no one knows).


  12. #372
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    158
    Your last line might be the key, the continuing to watch part. A lot of these people might have tried WWE, Impact, ROH, NJPW, and decided to give a new promotion a chance. I wouldn't call them lapsed WWE fans though, just lapsed wrestling fans.

    That said, without WWE network stats, it's really the silliest and most useless news in the history of news.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •