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  1. #1
    Member #25 SirSam's Avatar
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    Harry Potter Books

    So from the movies section I can see we have a few Harry Potter books.

    I recently started reading them again for the first time since the series wrapped and have been blown away by the depth I found. I have generally watched the movies once a year or so and knew they weren't great adaptations but going back has shown me just how much depth they miss.

    I am up to the 6th book and I have to say that Order of the Phoenix was amazing. Harry is so clearly going through PTSD that is not being dealt with by anyone. In fact the entire book is so full of personal failings from just about everyone to support and help Harry given what happened to him. Particularly guilty of this is Dumbledore who is very unsympathetically portrayed during the book. He basically knows that Harry can be possessed and instead of helping him he cuts himself off and then sets him lessons with a teacher who loathes him and provides no follow up. He knows the one thing that Harry needs is support and to know what is happening in light of what he saw at the end of The Goblet of Fire but offers NONE of it. Really brilliant character stuff.

    Also if anyone else is really interested I found a that is going through the whole series and analysing it from a critical perspective. Very interesting: http://pointnorthmedia.com/podcasts/dear-mr-potter/

  2. #2
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    I shall be giving that a listen on my way to work.

    OotP is probably my third favourite behind DH and GoF. Those three along with PoA are far superior to the other three in the series.

    Have booked tickets to see the The Cursed Child in February. I've read the script, so I know how it goes, but will be interesting to see if it improves on the film series.


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  3. #3
    Member #25 SirSam's Avatar
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    I haven't read Cursed Child because reading a script seems really bland to me and I know I'll see the stage show when it comes to Australia. What is it like? I haven't heard great things.

    With the podcast make sure you don't listen to the most recent episode, they just finished GOF and in between books they look at other influencing texts, just not a great jumping in point. I would suggest going back to the first episode covering GOF especially if it is one of your favs.

  4. #4
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    I've read two of them. Said it before but can't get into them where I've already seen the film. Don't really rate the writing that highly so I need the added element of the plot - the page-turner factor, if you like - to keep me going with them.

    So I read the fourth and the sixth, because they were freely available to me before I saw the movie version.

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  5. #5
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SirSam View Post
    I haven't read Cursed Child because reading a script seems really bland to me and I know I'll see the stage show when it comes to Australia. What is it like? I haven't heard great things.

    With the podcast make sure you don't listen to the most recent episode, they just finished GOF and in between books they look at other influencing texts, just not a great jumping in point. I would suggest going back to the first episode covering GOF especially if it is one of your favs.
    With my OCD, I simply couldn't start anywhere else other than the beginning!

    As a script it's fine. The writing isn't particularly great, but you miss so much of the magic as it is essentially 90% dialogue. I liked the story itself, even though it is slightly far-fetched, even for Harry Potter. However the play itself has got outstanding reviews, which is understandable as the whole thing was designed to be seen, not read. So really am looking forward to it. Heard the special effects are the most advanced seen on stage.



    Quote Originally Posted by Prime Time View Post
    I've read two of them. Said it before but can't get into them where I've already seen the film. Don't really rate the writing that highly so I need the added element of the plot - the page-turner factor, if you like - to keep me going with them.

    So I read the fourth and the sixth, because they were freely available to me before I saw the movie version.
    For me it is a page turner, however perhaps the reason it is for me is because I grew up with it. I was almost in the perfect catchment age as I read the first three when I was about 10/11. Then read each other book as it was released, with DH coming out when I was 17, same age as Harry is in that book.

    I've read better writing quality, for sure. But nothing quite as engrossing.


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  6. #6
    Senior Member 205 Clive's Avatar
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    I have read these books. What I do love about them is the massive world that Rowling has made up, all the world building stuff is great. Also, the genuine drive to see the babyfaces of the story win in the end is very strong. I applaud her for that.

    However, Rowling isn't the best writer in my opinion. Overuse of certain adverbs being the worst offender.

    For anyone in the middle of reading them just now, count how many times you read the words "Hermione said shrilly". You'll be pulling your hair out.

  7. #7
    Member #25 SirSam's Avatar
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    For me being able to create an interesting story and engaging characters trumps pure literary ability, if that statement makes any sense at all.

    The same is true with George R Martin as well, guy has a lot of weird quirks to his writing but damn ddid he spin a good tale.

    Of course there are some who do both well, Tolkien immediately springs to mind and so does Neil Gaimen too. Probably plenty more too.

  8. #8
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SirSam View Post
    For me being able to create an interesting story and engaging characters trumps pure literary ability, if that statement makes any sense at all.
    Not really, Sam!

    Though I suppose if you took the inherent subjectivity of the words 'interesting' and 'engaging' then I guess it would make sense translated into you like what you like and to hell with whether or not it's considered 'art'.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  9. #9
    Member #25 SirSam's Avatar
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    I guess what I am getting at is that I think constructing a story and constructing a sentence are two very different skills and I value the first one a lot more highly than the second when it comes to fiction.

    Of course you can't write a story well without having a really good grasp of the English language but I'm not one to get hung up on grammatical curiosities and potentially repetitive word usage if the story is fantastic.

  10. #10
    Repetitiveness can be a tool, actually ..I think we forget how weak the human mind is ..we look to assimilate things...ok so she uses the same sentences but our minds like to take something and relate it. That's why she's a millionaire
    Last edited by Benjamin Button; 07-25-2018 at 03:49 AM.

  11. #11
    Beautiful Fandom Mystic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benjamin Button View Post
    Repetitiveness can be a tool, actually ..I think we forget how weak the human mind is ..we look to assimilate things...ok so she uses the same sentences but our minds like to take something and relate it. That's why she's a millionaire
    Love this quote. Got to fix it only slightly though: "That's why she's a billionaire."

  12. #12
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SirSam View Post
    I guess what I am getting at is that I think constructing a story and constructing a sentence are two very different skills and I value the first one a lot more highly than the second when it comes to fiction.
    Oh, I kinda got that you were driving at something like that, but I say it didn't really make sense because I don't know of any definition of the 'literary' that wouldn't also encompass the ability to create characters and stories, is all. They're kinda key components.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  13. #13
    Senior Member 205 Clive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SirSam View Post
    For me being able to create an interesting story and engaging characters trumps pure literary ability, if that statement makes any sense at all.
    Hmmm. I agree that some things can be glosses over if the end result is something rewarding, but if there are traits used by an author that become repetitive to the point that it takes you out of the book altogether, then that's a concern, and takes your focus away from the story IMO

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