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  1. #81
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Can't say I have. I don't know much about YA fiction at all. I should probably correct that, given that a lot of people when they get to me, it's a lot of what they've read (and what made them enjoy it in the first place). So it could be very useful for me to know some of this stuff, even if it's just to make comparisons and allusions.

    Still in my political history kick at the moment, but only about 90 pages left in the last one (a huge fat thing on Lord Palmerston), after which I'll get back to some fiction. I'll be travelling for work in about two weeks so want to be in a position where I only have to take one book with me.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  2. #82
    Feeling Minnesota Powder's Avatar
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    I just started the book. I am a middle school teacher and I like reading a lot of the YA Dystopic fiction that my students read. For some reason that particular genre, Dytopic Fiction resonates with my students and me, for that matter. The premise of the book, which is the first of a trilogy is below, taken directly from Amazon, book two was released in January, and book 3, later this year.

    Two teens must learn the "art of killing" in this Printz Honor-winning book, the first in a chilling new series from Neal Shusterman, author of the New York Times best-selling Unwind Dystology series.

    A world with no hunger, no disease, no war, no misery: Humanity has conquered all those things and has even conquered death. Now Scythes are the only ones who can end life - and they are commanded to do so in order to keep the size of the population under control.

    Citra and Rowan are chosen to apprentice to a scythe - a role that neither wants. These teens must master the "art" of taking life, knowing that the consequence of failure could mean losing their own.

    Scythe is the first novel of a thrilling new series by National Book Award-winning author Neal Shusterman in which Citra and Rowan learn that a perfect world comes only with a heavy price.

  3. #83
    The Brain
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    That does seem like a very interesting premise!

  4. #84
    Feeling Minnesota Powder's Avatar
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    I'm about 80 pages in...very interesting.

  5. #85
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    There’s some good YA fiction that can still resonate with us adults. “On The Devil’s Court” is a book that I read as a teen, and I really want to read it again.

  6. #86
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Since my last post in here I read The Duke's Children, which is the sixth and final book in that old Victorian series I've post about several times in the thread, so I've finished that run now. I'm currently taking another look (after abandoning it as a student) at Stendhal's The Red and the Black, a novel about a social climber set in post-Napoleonic France.

    I can't say I love it so far, but I'm at least getting through it this time. I've got this weird idea of reading everything that I was supposed to read but didn't, and there are only a handful of things left on the list.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  7. #87
    Feeling Minnesota Powder's Avatar
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    So I've finished Scythe and its sequel Thunderhead, both very interesting, and the sequel does move past the basic premise and moves into a bigger story and the third book comes out in the fall.

    Once I finished those, I reread Ready Player One and Armada, both by Ernest Cline. Still really good.

    I am going to be picking up JR's book and reading that soon.

  8. #88
    The Brain
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    Really disliked Armada, personally. In Ready Player One the hero is already kind of a Mary Sue, a guy who just happens to be incredibly cooll and amazing at the thing the adventure is about, but at least outside of the game world he was kind of a sad sack and had to work on himself. In Armada, he's just a dude who plays video games, which somehow makes him great at real war, and also he's too cool for school and impresses the cool girl right away and he's just so cool and dangerous that everyone fears him... yeah, just couldn't get into it at all.

    Working through more Stephen King stuff myself, right now reading Desperation which has been pretty good, albeit a bit grim even by King's standards. I got lucky because it's a "mirror novel" with the Regulators, dealing with a lot of the same characters but in a different reality. I'm not sure if it adds a huge amount but it's interesting, and I'm enjoying reading them back to back.

  9. #89
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    I hear you about Armada, I just like Cline’s style. Armada is being made into a movie (sigh) and he is also writing a sequel to RP1, and the way that Armada left off a sequel will probably be in the works.

  10. #90
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    I picked up JR's book, Slobberknocker after reading one of Tito's columns and so far about 1/3 of the way through it is not all that great. It is what you would expect, but it is just getting to the [hopefully] better parts. Tito said that it provides insights to one of the best minds in the business, and I'm hoping for that, but so far it just is background on what JR was doing.

    An interesting read, but nothing spectacular....yet.

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