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  1. #121
    Puerto Rican dude living in Japan Degenerate's Avatar
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    45 books this year alone is insane. Good on you for dedicating the time for it. I don't think I ever could. I've been using more and more audiobooks lately to get a little more "reading" time in while I'm out walking or doing menial chores at home. I've pretty much replaced podcasts with audiobooks and I've been a lot happier with that decision.

    As for regular books, a few weeks ago I wrapped up The Fall of Hyperion. It was a good follow-up to the first book, but felt all over the place. While the story was all linked together in sequential order, I'm not sure how I felt about the story jumping between so many different characters and situations. There were a few days where I didn't read the book, and when I picked it up again I had to backtrack because I kind of lost my place. Still, it was a good way to wrap up the story of the first book, and would still recommend it for those who read Hyperion and want to know the conclusion of the story.

    After that I picked up The Forever War by Joe Haldeman. I've been enjoying these futuristic stories (even though this one was written in in the '70s, and the "future" in the story is 1997). I'm about a third into the book and so far the story has been interesting.

  2. #122
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    Damn, I'm sure you're far ahead of me then Pete! 45 books!

    Deg, I just read Fall of Hyperion recently! I can see your point that it was more scattered than the first book, which was at least a series of separate stories told one by one instead of wrapped up, but I still really loved it. Apparently there are more books in the series that continue the overarching story, which I'm quite curious about now.

    Finished up Deadhouse Gates and moved back to that category which just keeps on giving, Stephen King books. Now reading From A Buick 8, which so far has been very interesting!
    Last edited by mizfan; 09-18-2019 at 01:45 PM.

  3. #123
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prime Time View Post
    While a lot of my academic work probably helps with that, I think the real reason is the insomnia. I find I either read or watch old wrestling pretty much every night to try and get myself into a position to sleep - and because that can take a while it means I've usually got about two hours at the end of the day where I'm just reading. Sometimes more. So you do clear quite a few books just while you're waiting to get to sleep.
    From January - this is why I get through so many books. I'd rather just be able to sleep more easily, to be honest.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  4. #124
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Finished a couple over the weekend, updated my Goodreads and according to them, that's now 50 for the year. The one a week is looking like a good bet now.

    I've got one more old novel to read before I get through a slate of Cable's books, and I've also picked up a political history book called 'The Jeffersonian Persuasion'. It's a bit old now, published in the 1970s so hardly up to date scholarship, but it reads pretty well and seems like a good intro to some of the ideas they are raising. Haven't really got up to the Jefferson bits yet, still stuck in 17th century England in the early going!

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  5. #125
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    I've just finished Inverting The Pyramid by Jonathan Wilson, which is a book about the history of football tactics from the original English kick and rush of the 2-3-5, through the W-M of Herbert Chapman's Arsenal, the refinement to an W-W in the coffee shops of Hungary in the 40s and 50s, then the 4-2-4 of Brazil and Jock Stein before slowly morphing into what we have today. It was really, really fascinating, actually - well worth a look, I got lucky and found a copy in a charity shop.

    Got a book of Palahniuk short stories to read on the train to/from work now - despite it being very teenage/early-20s, I just can't shake Palahniuk as being an author where I'll pick something up of his and read it willingly.

    I'm also planning a trip to the library - got a couple of reservations there, something on indie rock at the turn of the Millenium and The Killing Joke for a reread off the back of watching Joker - where I'm intending to grab a couple of Shakespeares to read.

  6. #126
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oliver View Post
    I've just finished Inverting The Pyramid by Jonathan Wilson, which is a book about the history of football tactics from the original English kick and rush of the 2-3-5, through the W-M of Herbert Chapman's Arsenal, the refinement to an W-W in the coffee shops of Hungary in the 40s and 50s, then the 4-2-4 of Brazil and Jock Stein before slowly morphing into what we have today. It was really, really fascinating, actually - well worth a look, I got lucky and found a copy in a charity shop.
    .
    I read this a couple of years ago! Will co-sign the recommendation for any football fans (or even people who are just interested about sport in society, which should really be any wrestling fan at some level).

    If you want a similar but slightly different thing, you could look at the books by Simon Kuper, like 'Football Against the Enemy' or 'Why England Lose'.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  7. #127
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    Ah, I will do - cheers Prime! I'm considering tracking down Behind The Curtain by Wilson, which is just focused on Eastern European football.

  8. #128
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    Just started into After Sunset, a Stephen King short story collection. I'm enjoying it quite a bit, and the fact that I can seemingly just keep reading King and never be in danger of running out of new, enjoyable material!

  9. #129
    Puerto Rican dude living in Japan Degenerate's Avatar
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    You all have been racking up the reads! I always feel like it takes me forever to finish a book. But I've read a lot more this year than I realized, so I'm proud of myself for that.

    I wrapped up The Forever War a few days ago. It was a fun story, I enjoyed it a lot, especially towards the end.

    Continuing on the military sci-fi kick I've been on lately, I picked up Old Man's War by John Scalzi. I'm only about 30 pages in but I already know I'm going to like this book a lot.

  10. #130
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Finished another couple of old novels since I lost updated in here (more nineteenth century American stuff, though nothing I imagine would interest anyone who isn't a specialist) and that means according to Goodreads I've hit 52. Going to be more than one a week by the time the year is done.

    It's amazing how much my reading increased once my wrestling consumption dropped massively.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  11. #131
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    Finished After Sunset, which was typical good fun, then read a short little companion book to my favorite TV show of all time, Farscape, which was a good time. Now cracked open one of the few Joseph Heller books I've yet to read, Picture This. Enjoying it so far!

  12. #132
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Oh man, I loved Picture This. Definitely the weirdest moment of his career but that was one of my favourites of his. It's an underappreciated one for sure.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  13. #133
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    This might be an unusual pick for this crowd, but I just finished a riveting tale called Dragons Love Tacos 2 by Adam Rubin. A kid's book, as I am a parent, which makes me a bitch to small humans. So I only get to read their books, and watch their shows. (I sneak in wrestling in the few hours that they sleep/nap).


  14. #134
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    That does sound like fun! I'll have to remember to look it up when my kiddos roll around.

    I'm really enjoying Picture This. I'm a sucker for the way Heller writes and sometimes I can really get into history, so this is a weird but excellent mix of those two things.

    Feels a bit strange that Heller never really wrote anything that really resembles Catch 22 outside of the style of writing, except for Closing Time (which I know you didn't like Pete but I did!).

  15. #135
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Didn't like it is a stretch. It's just near the bottom of the list for me. Sort of like running out of ideas so you go back to the old ones. But there's still some fun in revisiting the characters and the style is still there.

    The only one I really didn't like was the very last one, Portrait of the Artist as an Old Man.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  16. #136
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    I even liked that one quite a bit, even if it was mostly about being horny (which isn't a huge departure for Heller anyway!).

  17. #137
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Ah, I found that one a slog. But it could be because I read it last in a project that meant reading or re-reading all his other novels in one go. I imagine that could have coloured my opinion.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  18. #138
    The Brain
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    Yeah, I can see a Heller binge not going well by the end. It takes some doing for me to follow him as he mentally zips around. Picture This is a great example, he jumps back and forth between Greece and the Netherlands (and other scattered places) so quickly I sometimes have to take a minute!

  19. #139
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    I think that's the book that shows off how smart he was. And I'm not entirely sure that's not a big point to writing it. But thankfully the style carries him through.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  20. #140
    The Brain
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    Absolutely true, on both counts!

  21. #141
    Puerto Rican dude living in Japan Degenerate's Avatar
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    I finished up Old Man's War last week. It was a decent story, but I was put off by the characters. Every main character felt the same and there was nothing to differentiate them from each other in the dialogue. The author was really dead-set in making everyone able to spew quick-witted sarcasm at a drop of a hat. Outside of the main character there was not much in the way of backstory for anyone else, nothing to grip me to them. When some of the characters died along the way, I really didn't care about it. I finished the book feeling a bit disappointed.

    I was going to give the sci-fi a bit of a break but I stumbled upon All Systems Red by Martha Wells for cheap. It's a short book which I prefer these days. So far it's alright.

  22. #142
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    I love a good sci fi but neither of those reviews makes me want to run out and grab either of them, haha.

  23. #143
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Finished my long run of C19th American novels and now moved onto an old English thing called Humphrey Clinker. It's an early novel told exclusively through letters. In all honesty, though, it's quite bawdy humour. So quite the change of pace from some of what I've been reading - you don't tend to get this in more chaste American books!

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  24. #144
    The Brain
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    Getting ready to start Infinite Jest. Anybody read it? If I shouldn't bother tell me before I start, because it's enormous!

  25. #145
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Truth be told, I've never read it. The people who I know who like it, love it. Do you like things like Don Delillo, or Franzen, or Pyncheon? If you don't, I'd probably say you're better off sidestepping it.

    But if the mecca of pure postmodernism sounds appealing, you might be one of the people who love it!

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  26. #146
    The Brain
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    I'm not really familiar with any of those three names(?), so I'll give it a shot and see what I think!

  27. #147
    Administrator Prime Time's Avatar
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    Tom Pyncheon is the best known of them, but Franzen got quite famous for a while there. Also got accused of being an elitest when he didn't want his book to be one of the Oprah book club reads.

    Maybe imagine Palahniuk, only more obviously intellectual and writing as if he didn't have to entertain anyone but himself.

    So maybe a bit like Picture This but three times as long and written with more of a Generation X sensibility?

    I'm grasping for comparisons because from the extracts I've looked at, it's not really like much else.

    "The worst moron is the one too stupid to realise they're a moron."

  28. #148
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    Well I enjoy Palahniuk and I really liked Picture This, so that's promising! Read just a few pages yesterday and it held my interest, at least. Curious if it can sustain itself over such a huge length of text though!

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