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  1. #1
    Author of 101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die Samuel 'Plan's Avatar
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    2019 Films - Running Top Tens

    So this is something I saw Doc and 205 Clive deciding to do on our Main Page for 205 Live matches throughout the year and I thought it would make for a neat thread here in the Movies forum! The idea is simple - list your top ten films, and update that list as you go throughout 2019 in a running scorecard! Not sure how well it'll work out but figured it was at least worth a go, right? For extra points I'm going to also keep a list of everything I've seen at the cinema too. I guess when there's a change to your top ten, pop up a new post and explain why you subbed one out for another!

    There's but one rule: only post films that were released in theaters / on streaming services in 2019 (and remember some films are released considerably later in other countries!).

    So I've only seen 9 thus far this year, but they are as follows, copied mostly from the General Discussion thread (then let me know yours too!):

    1. Green Book - tremendous film, I can understand why some have criticised it but I thought the two central performances and that relationship between their characters was really delightful and made it so infinitely watchable. I also thought it was confident in challenging the themes it deals with.

    2. Burning - saw this just last night and it's a tremendously dense, mercurial film with a sinister edge to it that's strangely intoxicating. It pulls you into this delirious atmosphere where you can't be sure of whether people are who they say they are or whether things are what they seem.

    3. Beautiful Boy - a lot of people have been condemning this, especially because of its use of music, but honestly I thought it was fantastic. The story is performed in a deeply affecting way and I'm a huge fan of Timotheé Chalamet, who puts in a central performance almost on par with his effort in Call Me By Your Name. Deeply moving.

    4. Destroyer - not quite the powerhouse I was anticipating, but Nicole Kidman is unrecognisable and pretty damn excellent. It's also got a really cool twist in it that totally took me by surprise, to the point of having me leaning forwards in my seat!

    5. Stan & Ollie - quietly charming, is how I would describe it. It felt a little straight-forward with no real peak in the drama to push it to that next level for me, but the the way they weaved in comic routines as if they'd come straight out of one of the classic Laurel and Hardy films was ingenious. More sterling performances too.

    6. Vice - a little disappointed with it, as I didn't realise it was Adam McKay, so finding it executed in a manner very similar of The Big Short took me by surprise. Was compelling for certain, but everything felt like it was trying a little too hard to really drive its nihilistic viewpoint home.

    7. Can You Ever Forgive Me? - like Stan & Ollie, it's a pretty straight-forward film really, but it lacks the same great performances that gave Stan & Ollie its charm. I know it's gotten some awards buzz and I'm honestly unsure why. I found it to be little more than solid.

    8. Glass - a fun new take on the comic book movie, but nowhere near the league of its Unbreakable originator. A couple of twists - one better than the other - aren't able to get it past that same issue every Shyamalan film has (perhaps except Unbreakable): he's just not a very good writer.

    9. Mary, Queen of Scots - had high hopes and they were dashed in pretty almighty fashion. Drier than stale bread, I thought the entire thing just fell flat. Characterisation was handled poorly in the script I felt, and it built to a big scene that then just...sort of...happened. "Eh," was how I felt coming out, having been acutely aware of its two hour run-time.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    Ah, if only I watched new films as frequently as I wish!

    I'll come back in a few months once I have seen more than... well, zero 2019 movies. Fun idea!


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  3. #3
    Author of 101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die Samuel 'Plan's Avatar
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    Look forward to it Gooner! No other uptake yet I see, but I've seen a couple more films - Alita: Battle Angel and All is True. So time for an update!

    1. Green Book - tremendous film, I can understand why some have criticised it but I thought the two central performances and that relationship between their characters was really delightful and made it so infinitely watchable. I also thought it was confident in challenging the themes it deals with.

    2. Burning - saw this just last night and it's a tremendously dense, mercurial film with a sinister edge to it that's strangely intoxicating. It pulls you into this delirious atmosphere where you can't be sure of whether people are who they say they are or whether things are what they seem.

    3. Beautiful Boy - a lot of people have been condemning this, especially because of its use of music, but honestly I thought it was fantastic. The story is performed in a deeply affecting way and I'm a huge fan of Timotheé Chalamet, who puts in a central performance almost on par with his effort in Call Me By Your Name. Deeply moving.

    4. Destroyer - not quite the powerhouse I was anticipating, but Nicole Kidman is unrecognisable and pretty damn excellent. It's also got a really cool twist in it that totally took me by surprise, to the point of having me leaning forwards in my seat!

    5. All is True - it's a quaint and curious little film about the later days of William Shakespeare, but thanks to its inflections of humour and the relative restraint of its more powerfully emotional scenes I actually really ended up liking it. Quite a lot, thinking about it. Kenneth Branagh and Ian McKellen stand out from a raft of excellent performances.

    6. Stan & Ollie - quietly charming, is how I would describe it. It felt a little straight-forward with no real peak in the drama to push it to that next level for me, but the the way they weaved in comic routines as if they'd come straight out of one of the classic Laurel and Hardy films was ingenious. More sterling performances too.

    7. Vice - a little disappointed with it, as I didn't realise it was Adam McKay, so finding it executed in a manner very similar of The Big Short took me by surprise. Was compelling for certain, but everything felt like it was trying a little too hard to really drive its nihilistic viewpoint home.

    8. Can You Ever Forgive Me? - like Stan & Ollie, it's a pretty straight-forward film really, but it lacks the same great performances that gave Stan & Ollie its charm. I know it's gotten some awards buzz and I'm honestly unsure why. I found it to be little more than solid.

    9. Glass - a fun new take on the comic book movie, but nowhere near the league of its Unbreakable originator. A couple of twists - one better than the other - aren't able to get it past that same issue every Shyamalan film has (perhaps except Unbreakable): he's just not a very good writer.

    10. Mary, Queen of Scots - had high hopes and they were dashed in pretty almighty fashion. Drier than stale bread, I thought the entire thing just fell flat. Characterisation was handled poorly in the script I felt, and it built to a big scene that then just...sort of...happened. "Eh," was how I felt coming out, having been acutely aware of its two hour run-time.


    UNRANKED

    Alita: Battle Angel - an ill disciplined mess with a plot that can't decide what it wants to be about and a series of poorly drawn characters in a world that feels half-cooked. I found it really rather boring, actually. The visuals were distracting more than they were impressive, it was much too long and the whole exercise was laden with cliche.

  4. #4
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    I wish I had the time and patience to be able to do this. I don't think I've seen a combined 10 new movies from 2016-2018, let alone being able to see 10 new movies in a single year. I'll be keeping up with this thread, though, so I know what I need to check out come 2021 or so.

  5. #5
    Author of 101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die Samuel 'Plan's Avatar
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    The thread's always here if anyone else, including yourself meandi, do get to a 10-film or more point! Saw another couple this weekend so figured I'd drop another update - new entries at 10 and 1!

    Look forward to it Gooner! No other uptake yet I see, but I've seen a couple more films - Alita: Battle Angel and All is True. So time for an update!

    1. A Private War - saw this one last night and while I'd been looking forward to it I didn't quite expect it to leave as much of an impression on me as it did. It's not so much gritty as it is just hard and unflinching. Rosamund Pike is spectacular in it and the way it shows the realities and impact of modern warfare is so powerful, because it does it with near photo-realistic restraint. I loved it.

    2. Green Book - tremendous film, I can understand why some have criticised it but I thought the two central performances and that relationship between their characters was really delightful and made it so infinitely watchable. I also thought it was confident in challenging the themes it deals with.

    3. Burning - saw this just last night and it's a tremendously dense, mercurial film with a sinister edge to it that's strangely intoxicating. It pulls you into this delirious atmosphere where you can't be sure of whether people are who they say they are or whether things are what they seem.

    4. Beautiful Boy - a lot of people have been condemning this, especially because of its use of music, but honestly I thought it was fantastic. The story is performed in a deeply affecting way and I'm a huge fan of Timotheé Chalamet, who puts in a central performance almost on par with his effort in Call Me By Your Name. Deeply moving.

    5. Destroyer - not quite the powerhouse I was anticipating, but Nicole Kidman is unrecognisable and pretty damn excellent. It's also got a really cool twist in it that totally took me by surprise, to the point of having me leaning forwards in my seat!

    6. All is True - it's a quaint and curious little film about the later days of William Shakespeare, but thanks to its inflections of humour and the relative restraint of its more powerfully emotional scenes I actually really ended up liking it. Quite a lot, thinking about it. Kenneth Branagh and Ian McKellen stand out from a raft of excellent performances.

    7. Stan & Ollie - quietly charming, is how I would describe it. It felt a little straight-forward with no real peak in the drama to push it to that next level for me, but the the way they weaved in comic routines as if they'd come straight out of one of the classic Laurel and Hardy films was ingenious. More sterling performances too.

    8. Vice - a little disappointed with it, as I didn't realise it was Adam McKay, so finding it executed in a manner very similar of The Big Short took me by surprise. Was compelling for certain, but everything felt like it was trying a little too hard to really drive its nihilistic viewpoint home.

    9. Can You Ever Forgive Me? - like Stan & Ollie, it's a pretty straight-forward film really, but it lacks the same great performances that gave Stan & Ollie its charm. I know it's gotten some awards buzz and I'm honestly unsure why. I found it to be little more than solid.

    10. If Beale Street Could Talk - like Mary, Queen of Scots this is one I went into really looking forward to seeing only to emerge bitterly disappointed. The first ten minutes are outrageously good, but then it's like the film forgets what made them good and starts laying foundations for a dozen more interesting films that then never take shape. Nothing seems to progress and its underlying point is made weakly for it. A shame.


    UNRANKED

    Alita: Battle Angel - an ill disciplined mess with a plot that can't decide what it wants to be about and a series of poorly drawn characters in a world that feels half-cooked. I found it really rather boring, actually. The visuals were distracting more than they were impressive, it was much too long and the whole exercise was laden with cliche.

    Glass - a fun new take on the comic book movie, but nowhere near the league of its Unbreakable originator. A couple of twists - one better than the other - aren't able to get it past that same issue every Shyamalan film has (perhaps except Unbreakable): he's just not a very good writer.

    Mary, Queen of Scots - had high hopes and they were dashed in pretty almighty fashion. Drier than stale bread, I thought the entire thing just fell flat. Characterisation was handled poorly in the script I felt, and it built to a big scene that then just...sort of...happened. "Eh," was how I felt coming out, having been acutely aware of its two hour run-time.

  6. #6
    Author of 101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die Samuel 'Plan's Avatar
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    The thread's always here if anyone else, including yourself meandi, do get to a 10-film or more point! Saw another couple this weekend so figured I'd drop another update - new entries at 10 and 1!

    Look forward to it Gooner! No other uptake yet I see, but I've seen a couple more films - Alita: Battle Angel and All is True. So time for an update!

    1. A Private War - saw this one last night and while I'd been looking forward to it I didn't quite expect it to leave as much of an impression on me as it did. It's not so much gritty as it is just hard and unflinching. Rosamund Pike is spectacular in it and the way it shows the realities and impact of modern warfare is so powerful, because it does it with near photo-realistic restraint. I loved it.

    2. Green Book - tremendous film, I can understand why some have criticised it but I thought the two central performances and that relationship between their characters was really delightful and made it so infinitely watchable. I also thought it was confident in challenging the themes it deals with.

    3. Burning - saw this just last night and it's a tremendously dense, mercurial film with a sinister edge to it that's strangely intoxicating. It pulls you into this delirious atmosphere where you can't be sure of whether people are who they say they are or whether things are what they seem.

    4. On the Basis of Sex - got to this one a couple of weeks ago and I really enjoyed it. Hard to think it'll be this high once the calendar really starts to unfold, but it was uplifting in a punch-the-air kind of way, I felt, if a little bit of a let down in the climactic court room scene that felt a little rushed. Not too much to moan about though, as it was more of a character study anyway.

    5. Beautiful Boy - a lot of people have been condemning this, especially because of its use of music, but honestly I thought it was fantastic. The story is performed in a deeply affecting way and I'm a huge fan of Timotheé Chalamet, who puts in a central performance almost on par with his effort in Call Me By Your Name. Deeply moving.

    6. Destroyer - not quite the powerhouse I was anticipating, but Nicole Kidman is unrecognisable and pretty damn excellent. It's also got a really cool twist in it that totally took me by surprise, to the point of having me leaning forwards in my seat!

    7. All is True - it's a quaint and curious little film about the later days of William Shakespeare, but thanks to its inflections of humour and the relative restraint of its more powerfully emotional scenes I actually really ended up liking it. Quite a lot, thinking about it. Kenneth Branagh and Ian McKellen stand out from a raft of excellent performances.

    8. Stan & Ollie - quietly charming, is how I would describe it. It felt a little straight-forward with no real peak in the drama to push it to that next level for me, but the the way they weaved in comic routines as if they'd come straight out of one of the classic Laurel and Hardy films was ingenious. More sterling performances too.

    9. Instant Family - one I managed to sneak in unexpectedly last night, I was pleasantly surprised by it. Sure it was a bit cheesy and hammy and, at times, AWFULLY acted by the adult leads, but it made me a chuckle a handful of times and the more dramatic moments were executed well. I left feeling somewhat uplifted.

    10. Fighting With My Family - a strange experience for a wrestling fan, but one I'm glad I took the time to take in. Not the movie I wanted as a wrestling fan or as a film goer, and never hits the lofty heights of the best British comedy dramas, but it's got one very compelling character arc, some excellent performances and a bunch of laugh out loud moments.

    UNRANKED

    Alita: Battle Angel - an ill disciplined mess with a plot that can't decide what it wants to be about and a series of poorly drawn characters in a world that feels half-cooked. I found it really rather boring, actually. The visuals were distracting more than they were impressive, it was much too long and the whole exercise was laden with cliche.

    Can You Ever Forgive Me? - like Stan & Ollie, it's a pretty straight-forward film really, but it lacks the same great performances that gave Stan & Ollie its charm. I know it's gotten some awards buzz and I'm honestly unsure why. I found it to be little more than solid.

    Captain Marvel - generic Marvel film is generic Marvel film. Nothing much else to say on it, honestly!

    Cold Pursuit - a real odd one, that seems to enjoy being a now cliche Liam Neeson action vehicle (no pun intended) while being joyous in keeping its tongue firmly in cheek and sort of winking at the ridiculousness of this latter-day Neeson wave of action flicks. It was noticably overlong, at times mildly entertaining, but generally...just odd.

    Glass - a fun new take on the comic book movie, but nowhere near the league of its Unbreakable originator. A couple of twists - one better than the other - aren't able to get it past that same issue every Shyamalan film has (perhaps except Unbreakable): he's just not a very good writer.

    If Beale Street Could Talk - like Mary, Queen of Scots this is one I went into really looking forward to seeing only to emerge bitterly disappointed. The first ten minutes are outrageously good, but then it's like the film forgets what made them good and starts laying foundations for a dozen more interesting films that then never take shape. Nothing seems to progress and its underlying point is made weakly for it. A shame.

    Mary, Queen of Scots - had high hopes and they were dashed in pretty almighty fashion. Drier than stale bread, I thought the entire thing just fell flat. Characterisation was handled poorly in the script I felt, and it built to a big scene that then just...sort of...happened. "Eh," was how I felt coming out, having been acutely aware of its two hour run-time.

    Vice - a little disappointed with it, as I didn't realise it was Adam McKay, so finding it executed in a manner very similar of The Big Short took me by surprise. Was compelling for certain, but everything felt like it was trying a little too hard to really drive its nihilistic viewpoint home.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    It's dawned on me that I have watched 10 previously un-watched films this year, but they weren't all released in 2019 (so, new films to me, but not new in and of itself). Perhaps I could start with those? Just don't want to destroy the purpose of the thread!

    EDIT: I'm just going to go ahead and do this. I'll ask for forgiveness if need be!

    1. A Quiet Place (2018). Best horror film I've seen in years, superbly acted and a genuinely scary proposition. Heard there's a sequel out, which should be awesome.

    2. The Big Short (2015). Really liked this, a great cast and a really interesting view into the 2008 economic crash. Steve Carrell steals the show.

    3. Captain Marvel (2019). Nice origin story, well structured, if perhaps a few years too late. Felt weird watching an origin story after Infinity War.

    4. Bohemian Rhapsody (2018). The film itself is fine, if perhaps a little safe. But Rami Malek deserves his Oscar for a fantastic performance as Freddie Mercury.

    5. Gone Girl (2014). I saw the big twist coming, but it was still effective. It's quite a tricky film to watch as roles are reversed unexpectedly (though I did see it coming) and it's hard to come to a conclusion on how I felt. Intrigued, if not perhaps enamoured by it.

    6. The Imitation Game (2014). Film about Alan Turing, someone I studied about at Uni. It's an OK film, though I think it misses out a lot on certain aspects of his life.

    7. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011). I had heard great things about this, but was left very disappointed. Didn't grab me at all and I found the plot confusing. The acting was fine though.

    8. Need For Speed (2014). Fun for what it was, but not very memorable. Car scenes were a little below Fast and Furious' level, though that also made them more realistic I guess.

    9. Fargo (1996). Another film that disappointed me. It had a Tarantino feel to it, but I just didn't get into it at all. I also could get over the amount of 'Oh Yeah' dialog that took place.

    10. Circle (2015). Interesting premise, and a nice twist ending. But very much a B movie at best.
    Last edited by Gooner; 04-03-2019 at 11:37 AM.


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  8. #8
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    Seen a couple more films since, so updating this. As a reminder, my list is of films I have never seen before, regardless of if they were released this year or not. All films I have seen after January 1st 2019.

    1. Avengers: Endgame. Yes, it's not perfect, but I have not marked out for a film as much as this one since Star Wars Episode 7 or The Dark Knight. A film that justifies watching the proceeding 20-odd films before it is incredibly satisfying.

    2. A Quiet Place (2018). Best horror film I've seen in years, superbly acted and a genuinely scary proposition. Heard there's a sequel out, which should be awesome.

    3. The Big Short (2015). Really liked this, a great cast and a really interesting view into the 2008 economic crash. Steve Carrell steals the show.

    4. The Devil Wears Prada. I really enjoyed this, surprisingly. Meryl Streep is brilliant and the remaining cast play their part well. My mother worked in the fashion industry so she was able to pick apart certain aspects, but for a film supposedly based on Anna Wintour, it's a fascinating story. The less said about the love interest, however, the better.

    5. Bohemian Rhapsody (2018). The film itself is fine, if perhaps a little safe. But Rami Malek deserves his Oscar for a fantastic performance as Freddie Mercury.

    6. Gone Girl (2014). I saw the big twist coming, but it was still effective. It's quite a tricky film to watch as roles are reversed unexpectedly (though I did see it coming) and it's hard to come to a conclusion on how I felt. Intrigued, if not perhaps enamoured by it.

    7. Captain Marvel (2019). Nice origin story, well structured, if perhaps a few years too late. Felt weird watching an origin story after Infinity War. I've bumped this down a couple of places due to events in Avengers: Endgame, as it has slightly changed my perception of this film.

    8. The Imitation Game (2014). Film about Alan Turing, someone I studied about at Uni. It's an OK film, though I think it misses out a lot on certain aspects of his life.

    9. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011). I had heard great things about this, but was left very disappointed. Didn't grab me at all and I found the plot confusing. The acting was fine though.

    10. Need For Speed (2014). Fun for what it was, but not very memorable. Car scenes were a little below Fast and Furious' level, though that also made them more realistic I guess.


    Unranked:

    Fargo (1996). Another film that disappointed me. It had a Tarantino feel to it, but I just didn't get into it at all. I also could get over the amount of 'Oh Yeah' dialog that took place.

    Circle (2015). Interesting premise, and a nice twist ending. But very much a B movie at best.


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  9. #9
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    The thing with Fargo, as with all Coen Brothers films... you either love them or you hate them. All of their movies are weird and eclectic and... yeah. For instance, Burn After Reading is comedy genius in my opinion, and I absolutely love it. Chick I dated for a while said it was one of the dumbest movies she’s ever seen and couldn’t stand it.

  10. #10
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    A Quiet Place 2: the release date as of now is set for May 2020.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by meandi View Post
    The thing with Fargo, as with all Coen Brothers films... you either love them or you hate them. All of their movies are weird and eclectic and... yeah. For instance, Burn After Reading is comedy genius in my opinion, and I absolutely love it. Chick I dated for a while said it was one of the dumbest movies she’s ever seen and couldn’t stand it.
    I agree, I could just about tell that it gave a vibe of 'other people will love this' but I was not one of them.

    Haven't seen Burn After Reading for ages, but I remember also not particularly liking it, I must say.

    Next on my list is probably 'It Follows' followed by 'Tag'. Will update soon!


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  12. #12
    Author of 101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die Samuel 'Plan's Avatar
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    Great to see some others jump on this! Planning a major update sometime soon. I think I'm up to around 30-something now though, so it'll be a big post lol.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    New update, two more added. I said I would watch Tag and It Follows, however I decided instead to start the DCEU movies. I had already watched Man Of Steel therefore it shall not be part of the list (but fyi, I preferred it to the two following it).

    As a reminder, my list is of films I have never seen before, regardless of if they were released this year or not. All films I have seen after January 1st 2019.

    1. Avengers: Endgame (2019). Yes, it's not perfect, but I have not marked out for a film as much as this one since Star Wars Episode 7 or The Dark Knight. A film that justifies watching the proceeding 20-odd films before it is incredibly satisfying.

    2. A Quiet Place (2018). Best horror film I've seen in years, superbly acted and a genuinely scary proposition. Heard there's a sequel out, which should be awesome.

    3. The Big Short (2015). Really liked this, a great cast and a really interesting view into the 2008 economic crash. Steve Carrell steals the show.

    4. The Devil Wears Prada (2006). I really enjoyed this, surprisingly. Meryl Streep is brilliant and the remaining cast play their part well. My mother worked in the fashion industry so she was able to pick apart certain aspects, but for a film supposedly based on Anna Wintour, it's a fascinating story. The less said about the love interest, however, the better.

    5. Bohemian Rhapsody (2018). The film itself is fine, if perhaps a little safe. But Rami Malek deserves his Oscar for a fantastic performance as Freddie Mercury.

    6. Gone Girl (2014). I saw the big twist coming, but it was still effective. It's quite a tricky film to watch as roles are reversed unexpectedly (though I did see it coming) and it's hard to come to a conclusion on how I felt. Intrigued, if not perhaps enamoured by it.

    7. Captain Marvel (2019). Nice origin story, well structured, if perhaps a few years too late. Felt weird watching an origin story after Infinity War. I've bumped this down a couple of places due to events in Avengers: Endgame, as it has slightly changed my perception of this film.

    8. The Imitation Game (2014). Film about Alan Turing, someone I studied about at Uni. It's an OK film, though I think it misses out a lot on certain aspects of his life.

    9. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011). I had heard great things about this, but was left very disappointed. Didn't grab me at all and I found the plot confusing. The acting was fine though.

    10. Batman v Superman: Dawn Of Justice (2016). I'm still a little unsure how I feel about this. Some things I adored (Wonder Woman, Alfred, dark tone...), some I loathed (Lex, Doomsday, killings, leaps of faith in terms of credibility, story...). Very weird film to have an opinion on, but I came out of it thinking that I didn't like it. Affleck was good as an 'older' Batman, better than expected. But I think this is the film that convinced me that, after only two films, the DCEU is not on the right track. And is it just me or is every character, good or bad, really unlikable?

    Unranked:

    Need For Speed (2014). Fun for what it was, but not very memorable. Car scenes were a little below Fast and Furious' level, though that also made them more realistic I guess.

    Suicide Squad (2016). I must say I hated this. I really wanted to like it from the trailers, but for me this was just a total mess, loads of pacing issues, really unlikeable characters and missed opportunities. The focus is clearly on Deadshot and Harley, with the rest of the squad just bit part players (seriously, Captain Boomerang?!), the most interesting character, the Joker, is a side character, the main mission is just quite honestly boring... Yeah, didn't like it.

    Fargo (1996). Another film that disappointed me. It had a Tarantino feel to it, but I just didn't get into it at all. I also could get over the amount of 'Oh Yeah' dialog that took place.

    Circle (2015). Interesting premise, and a nice twist ending. But very much a B movie at best.


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  14. #14
    Member #25 SirSam's Avatar
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    Love that you gave The Big Short a callout. I work in banking and got everyone in my branch to watch it. Freakin' fantastic film that boils down complex financial stuff to really digestible and even entertaining bits. Great way to present the story.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    Absolutely; to be honest I'd always been intrigued by the crash. Being 18 at the time, I didn't understand it when it happened, even though I have and will feel the effects of it for years to come.

    The film itself is a great way of explaining it (with minor creative changes) but it wouldn't have worked without the stellar cast.


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  16. #16
    Author of 101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die Samuel 'Plan's Avatar
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    Awww man. Another person who didn't like BvS! I adore that film, but am starting to think I'm the only one! If you dug Wonder Woman in it you might really enjoy her solo movie so I'd recommend that if you haven't seen it. Aquaman was bizarre but they leaned into it enough they got away with it for the most part I think. Shazam was all kinds of straight-up awesome though. Would love to hear your thoughts on any of these Gooner!

    Need to seriously update my own list. I'm like, 15 behind or something stupid.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    Yeah, they'll probably be next on my list (I have OCD about finishing things through before moving on to the next thing. As you could imagine, watching all Marvel films back to back before Endgame was a chore!).

    Yeah BvS... I really wanted to like it, but too many creative decisions went against what I like.


    I've tried taking up column writing, check it out here!

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  18. #18
    Author of 101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die Samuel 'Plan's Avatar
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    Ok, massive update coming! I've now got a top 10, a bottom 10 and the rest are unranked in alphabetical order.

    Top 10.

    1. Aladdin - never expected this to be sat at the top of my list when I heard they were remaking it, and really didn't expect it after I'd seen the trailers, but I enjoyed the hell out of it. It reminded me what it felt like to be a kid in the cinema again, and that's an invaluable sensation. Loved it to bits!

    2. A Private War - I didn't quite expect it to leave as much of an impression on me as it did. It's not so much gritty as it is just hard and unflinching. Rosamund Pike is spectacular in it and the way it shows the realities and impact of modern warfare is so powerful, because it does it with near photo-realistic restraint. I loved it.

    3. Avengers: Endgame - I know it's a predictable inclusion, and I'm almost loathe to include it in the first place because of how utterly unique it is. It's one giant massive set-piece culminating ten years and over twenty movies of storytelling, married tightly to the styling of its source format (comic books). But I cried a good four or five times because of two or three separate emotions when I first saw it, and it's a memory that'll stick in my head for a long time. Whether it's any good or not, I have no idea.

    4. Green Book - tremendous film, I can understand why some have criticised it but I thought the two central performances and that relationship between their characters was really delightful and made it so infinitely watchable. I also thought it was confident in challenging the themes it deals with.

    5. Burning - it's a tremendously dense, mercurial film with a sinister edge to it that's strangely intoxicating. It pulls you into this delirious atmosphere where you can't be sure of whether people are who they say they are or whether things are what they seem.

    6. Shazam! - after the headiness and weight of something like Endgame, it was wonderful to return to a more normalised sense of superhero movie not chained together by a need to build to something else (even though it sort of does) and not married to the familiar Marvel formula. It had charismatic leads, fun action and a whole lot of wit.

    7. Rocketman - I know it didn't come in for the same sort of love that something like Bohemian Rhapsody did, and probably for the right reasons as it never fully embraces its obvious desire to be a musical. I still found it a heart warming and empathetic story with tear jerking beats and a standout central performance from Egerton though. Especially the finale's version of my favourite Elton track, I'm Still Standing.

    8. Spider-Man: Far From Home - like Shazam!, it was a refreshing superhero movie by virtue of its smaller scale. It feels familiar because of its studio, though, bringing it lower down for me, and it's still heavily concerned with where its franchise heads next. A fun turn by Gyllenhaal, a typically charismatic Tom Holland and a focus on character over plot are boons but I'm not convinced it bested the phenomenal Homecoming.

    9. John Wick: Chapter 3: Parabellum - the usually balletic action sequences see this rank high for me naturally, as does the continued imaginative world building that helped the first in the franchise hit that cult classic status. It feels a little overly familiar at this stage though, not differentiating itself enough from Chapter 2 to truly stand out, and creating an overly complex plot at its conclusion. Seeing alumni of the two Raid movies was awesome, if a reminder of what I could have watched instead.

    10. X-Men: Dark Phoenix - yeah, really! I don't think it deserves half the critical mauling its received, and certainly deserved far better than its poor box office performance. It was a tight knit film with a simple plot and the usual sterling performances from the familiar long-serving cast members. A properly thrumming score by Hans Zimmer helps massively too. I genuinely really enjoyed the hell out of this climax to my low key favourite superhero movie franchise of them all!


    Bottom 10 (in no particular order).

    Once Upon a Time in Hollywood - see the general discussion thread for a fuller review; here, I'll simply say it's Tarantino at his worst and most self-indulgent yet, and the results are festeringly uncomfortable.

    Fisherman's Friends - another in a long line of quaint British films about a knit-wear sporting underdog confronting the toxic influences of modern affluence. Yawn.

    Godzilla: King of Monster - its incoherent plotting, refusal to take its own stakes seriously and absolutely ear-melting dialogue are only bested by the sheer boredom on the faces of the various main leads. It's a mess of atomic proportions.

    MIB International - a towering testament to vapid and soulless studio franchise fishing, there's nothing in its ooverlong run-time to justify its existence. You also get the impression, after the success of Thor: Ragnarok, Chris Hemsworth has suddenly decided he's far funnier than he actually is.

    The Sun is Also a Star - apparently based on a book, this little ditty about a young woman fighting the deportation of her family could have been engaginly topical but instead watches like the work of a first year film student adapting the writing of a first year philosophy student.

    Fast & Furious: Hobbs and Shaw - it's trashy, it doesn't make much sense, it plays fast and loose with good taste in its writing, flirts with homophobia and full on embraces toxic machoism, and it revels in all of these things. It's a film that knows it has an audience and does as little as it needs to in order to appeal to only them.

    Cold Pursuit - a real odd one, that seems to enjoy being a now cliche Liam Neeson action vehicle (no pun intended) while being joyous in keeping its tongue firmly in cheek and sort of winking at the ridiculousness of this latter-day Neeson wave of action flicks. It was noticably overlong, at times mildly entertaining, but generally...just odd.

    Alita: Battle Angel - an ill disciplined mess with a plot that can't decide what it wants to be about and a series of poorly drawn characters in a world that feels half-cooked. I found it really rather boring, actually. The visuals were distracting more than they were impressive, it was much too long and the whole exercise was laden with cliche.

    Detective Pikachu - now that Ryan Reynolds is apparently the funniest man on earth following the inexplicable success of his one-trick-pony, barely-a-film Deadpool effort, I'm not surprised this avoided the absolute mauling it deserved because, honestly, it's awful in almost every way.

    Long Shot - cliché riddled, unimaginative and obvious nonsense that preaches a familiar viewpoint before crushingly failing to avoid the trap of proceeding to then lecture the lecturers. Bow down to the mighty wisdom of Seth Rogen and his apparently ingenious observation that, shock, politics often has points worth making on both sides of the spectrum! *Gasp!*


    Unranked.

    All is True - it's a quaint and curious little film about the later days of William Shakespeare, but thanks to its inflections of humour and the relative restraint of its more powerfully emotional scenes I actually really ended up liking it. Quite a lot, thinking about it. Kenneth Branagh and Ian McKellen stand out from a raft of excellent performances.

    Aftermath – a dry post-WWII drama that never really goes beyond its unoriginal basis of a struggling marriage dissolving into a destructive affair. It just has an intriguing historical setting.[/B]

    Beautiful Boy - a lot of people have been condemning this, especially because of its use of music, but honestly I thought it was fantastic. The story is performed in a deeply affecting way and I'm a huge fan of Timotheé Chalamet, who puts in a central performance almost on par with his effort in Call Me By Your Name. Deeply moving.

    Blinded by the Light - a breezy and relatively fun coming-of-age story about a young man growing up in 1980s Luton experiencing the prejudices of the time, it really needs you to be a fan of its choice of inspiration – Bruce Springsteen – to go beyond simply 'good.'

    Booksmart - a funny and charming buddy comedy about two studious young women wanting to leave high school behind when they realise life isn't the two dimensional 'successful hard workers vs. slacker failures' world adults tell you it is. Its jokes and character beats are all a tad familiar though.

    Can You Ever Forgive Me? - like Stan & Ollie, it's a pretty straight-forward film really, but it lacks the same great performances that gave Stan & Ollie its charm. I know it's gotten some awards buzz and I'm honestly unsure why. I found it to be little more than solid.

    Captain Marvel - generic Marvel film is generic Marvel film. Nothing much else to say on it, honestly! Fun soundtrack though.

    Destroyer - not quite the powerhouse I was anticipating, but Nicole Kidman is unrecognisable and pretty damn excellent. It's also got a really cool twist in it that totally took me by surprise, to the point of having me leaning forwards in my seat!

    Fighting with my Family - a strange experience for a wrestling fan, but one I'm glad I took the time to take in. Not the movie I wanted as a wrestling fan or as a film goer, and never hits the lofty heights of the best British comedy dramas, but it's got one very compelling character arc, some excellent performances and a bunch of laugh out loud moments.

    Glass - a fun new take on the comic book movie, but nowhere near the league of its Unbreakable originator. A couple of twists - one better than the other - aren't able to get it past that same issue every Shyamalan film has (perhaps except Unbreakable): he's just not a very good writer.

    How To Train Your Dragon 3: The Hidden World - as endearing an entry into the series as its preceding two movies, HTTYD 3 doesn't really do enough original creating to manage more than mildly entertaining you for 90 minutes. It's a decent send-off for the characters though.

    If Beale Street Could Talk - like Mary, Queen of Scots this is one I went into really looking forward to seeing only to emerge bitterly disappointed. The first ten minutes are outrageously good, but then it's like the film forgets what made them good and starts laying foundations for a dozen more interesting films that then never take shape. Nothing seems to progress and its underlying point is made weakly for it. A shame.

    Instant Family - I was pleasantly surprised by it. Sure it was a bit cheesy and hammy and, at times, AWFULLY acted by the adult leads, but it made me a chuckle a handful of times and the more dramatic moments were executed well. I left feeling somewhat uplifted.

    Mary, Queen of Scots - had high hopes and they were dashed in pretty almighty fashion. Drier than stale bread, I thought the entire thing just fell flat. Characterisation was handled poorly in the script I felt, and it built to a big scene that then just...sort of...happened. "Eh," was how I felt coming out, having been acutely aware of its two hour run-time.

    Mid90s - likely to have flown under many radars, it's a cool coming of age story that deals with some challenging themes but ultimately decides to pay them only passing lip service as it instead focusses on attempting to evoke as much nostalgia for the skating scene of the time of its title as it can.

    On the Basis of Sex - I really enjoyed it. It was uplifting in a punch-the-air kind of way, I felt, if a little bit of a let down in the climactic court room scene that felt a little rushed. Not too much to moan about though, as it was more of a character study anyway.

    Stan & Ollie - quietly charming, is how I would describe it. It felt a little straight-forward with no real peak in the drama to push it to that next level for me, but the the way they weaved in comic routines as if they'd come straight out of one of the classic Laurel and Hardy films was ingenious. More sterling performances too.

    Stuber - a relatively prototypical buddy cop movie in which one of the buddies isn't a cop, it gets by on the obvious love for the project its two leads, Dave Bautista and Kumail Najiani, share. They have a blast throughout and the enjoyment rubs off, despite a pretty ordinary script.

    The Current War - this dramatisation of the battle to 'own electricity' at the point of its roll out across the United States feels quite dry, albeit with some creative direction. Benedict Cumberbatch plays a now all-too familiar role, Tom Holland feels under-utilised but Michael Shannon steals the show with his emotionally complex effort. It has its moments, but it generally fails to reach what its potential seems to be.

    The Lion King - I enjoyed it more during a second viewing, but the issue here is it remains an animated remake of an animated film, in which the most fun and fantastical elements have been stripped out in the name of photo realism. Impressive technically, and with truly outstanding turns from Donald Glover and Chiwetel Ejiofor, it nevertheless feels unnecessary, if not disappointing.

    The Matrix - I got a chance to catch a 20th anniversary re-release and I tell you, should you get the chance to see it on the big screen you absolutely should. It's still a classic.

    The Sisters Brothers - a curiosity of a story that feels like it's building towards something of a complex narrative structure composed of a series of intriguing and lively characters, only to peter out into an odd and straight-forward second half that fails to do anything interesting with those aforementioned characters. An oddity of a Western.

    Toy Story 4 - isn't the unmitigated disaster some might have feared, but nor is it in any way necessary. Quite the opposite, despite entertaining for its run-time and finding an emotional truth at the heart of a story as sincere as any others in the franchise, the fact it feels completely unnecessary after the beautiful conclusion to its immediate predecessor leads to an ultimately empty experience. It's fine, but it's not a part of my Toy Story trilogy honestly.

    Vice - a little disappointed with it, as I didn't realise it was Adam McKay, so finding it executed in a manner very similar of The Big Short took me by surprise. Was compelling for certain, but everything felt like it was trying a little too hard to really drive its nihilistic viewpoint home.

    Yesterday - it's a heartfelt and sincere-enough story, a typically cooky one from Danny Boyle, but the entire project falls down on the fact that the central character spends pretty much the entire film being pretty awful to almost everyone around him, or self-absorbed when he isn't.

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