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  1. #1
    Author of 101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die Samuel 'Plan's Avatar
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    2019 Films - Running Top Tens

    So this is something I saw Doc and 205 Clive deciding to do on our Main Page for 205 Live matches throughout the year and I thought it would make for a neat thread here in the Movies forum! The idea is simple - list your top ten films, and update that list as you go throughout 2019 in a running scorecard! Not sure how well it'll work out but figured it was at least worth a go, right? For extra points I'm going to also keep a list of everything I've seen at the cinema too. I guess when there's a change to your top ten, pop up a new post and explain why you subbed one out for another!

    There's but one rule: only post films that were released in theaters / on streaming services in 2019 (and remember some films are released considerably later in other countries!).

    So I've only seen 9 thus far this year, but they are as follows, copied mostly from the General Discussion thread (then let me know yours too!):

    1. Green Book - tremendous film, I can understand why some have criticised it but I thought the two central performances and that relationship between their characters was really delightful and made it so infinitely watchable. I also thought it was confident in challenging the themes it deals with.

    2. Burning - saw this just last night and it's a tremendously dense, mercurial film with a sinister edge to it that's strangely intoxicating. It pulls you into this delirious atmosphere where you can't be sure of whether people are who they say they are or whether things are what they seem.

    3. Beautiful Boy - a lot of people have been condemning this, especially because of its use of music, but honestly I thought it was fantastic. The story is performed in a deeply affecting way and I'm a huge fan of Timotheé Chalamet, who puts in a central performance almost on par with his effort in Call Me By Your Name. Deeply moving.

    4. Destroyer - not quite the powerhouse I was anticipating, but Nicole Kidman is unrecognisable and pretty damn excellent. It's also got a really cool twist in it that totally took me by surprise, to the point of having me leaning forwards in my seat!

    5. Stan & Ollie - quietly charming, is how I would describe it. It felt a little straight-forward with no real peak in the drama to push it to that next level for me, but the the way they weaved in comic routines as if they'd come straight out of one of the classic Laurel and Hardy films was ingenious. More sterling performances too.

    6. Vice - a little disappointed with it, as I didn't realise it was Adam McKay, so finding it executed in a manner very similar of The Big Short took me by surprise. Was compelling for certain, but everything felt like it was trying a little too hard to really drive its nihilistic viewpoint home.

    7. Can You Ever Forgive Me? - like Stan & Ollie, it's a pretty straight-forward film really, but it lacks the same great performances that gave Stan & Ollie its charm. I know it's gotten some awards buzz and I'm honestly unsure why. I found it to be little more than solid.

    8. Glass - a fun new take on the comic book movie, but nowhere near the league of its Unbreakable originator. A couple of twists - one better than the other - aren't able to get it past that same issue every Shyamalan film has (perhaps except Unbreakable): he's just not a very good writer.

    9. Mary, Queen of Scots - had high hopes and they were dashed in pretty almighty fashion. Drier than stale bread, I thought the entire thing just fell flat. Characterisation was handled poorly in the script I felt, and it built to a big scene that then just...sort of...happened. "Eh," was how I felt coming out, having been acutely aware of its two hour run-time.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    Ah, if only I watched new films as frequently as I wish!

    I'll come back in a few months once I have seen more than... well, zero 2019 movies. Fun idea!


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  3. #3
    Author of 101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die Samuel 'Plan's Avatar
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    Look forward to it Gooner! No other uptake yet I see, but I've seen a couple more films - Alita: Battle Angel and All is True. So time for an update!

    1. Green Book - tremendous film, I can understand why some have criticised it but I thought the two central performances and that relationship between their characters was really delightful and made it so infinitely watchable. I also thought it was confident in challenging the themes it deals with.

    2. Burning - saw this just last night and it's a tremendously dense, mercurial film with a sinister edge to it that's strangely intoxicating. It pulls you into this delirious atmosphere where you can't be sure of whether people are who they say they are or whether things are what they seem.

    3. Beautiful Boy - a lot of people have been condemning this, especially because of its use of music, but honestly I thought it was fantastic. The story is performed in a deeply affecting way and I'm a huge fan of Timotheé Chalamet, who puts in a central performance almost on par with his effort in Call Me By Your Name. Deeply moving.

    4. Destroyer - not quite the powerhouse I was anticipating, but Nicole Kidman is unrecognisable and pretty damn excellent. It's also got a really cool twist in it that totally took me by surprise, to the point of having me leaning forwards in my seat!

    5. All is True - it's a quaint and curious little film about the later days of William Shakespeare, but thanks to its inflections of humour and the relative restraint of its more powerfully emotional scenes I actually really ended up liking it. Quite a lot, thinking about it. Kenneth Branagh and Ian McKellen stand out from a raft of excellent performances.

    6. Stan & Ollie - quietly charming, is how I would describe it. It felt a little straight-forward with no real peak in the drama to push it to that next level for me, but the the way they weaved in comic routines as if they'd come straight out of one of the classic Laurel and Hardy films was ingenious. More sterling performances too.

    7. Vice - a little disappointed with it, as I didn't realise it was Adam McKay, so finding it executed in a manner very similar of The Big Short took me by surprise. Was compelling for certain, but everything felt like it was trying a little too hard to really drive its nihilistic viewpoint home.

    8. Can You Ever Forgive Me? - like Stan & Ollie, it's a pretty straight-forward film really, but it lacks the same great performances that gave Stan & Ollie its charm. I know it's gotten some awards buzz and I'm honestly unsure why. I found it to be little more than solid.

    9. Glass - a fun new take on the comic book movie, but nowhere near the league of its Unbreakable originator. A couple of twists - one better than the other - aren't able to get it past that same issue every Shyamalan film has (perhaps except Unbreakable): he's just not a very good writer.

    10. Mary, Queen of Scots - had high hopes and they were dashed in pretty almighty fashion. Drier than stale bread, I thought the entire thing just fell flat. Characterisation was handled poorly in the script I felt, and it built to a big scene that then just...sort of...happened. "Eh," was how I felt coming out, having been acutely aware of its two hour run-time.


    UNRANKED

    Alita: Battle Angel - an ill disciplined mess with a plot that can't decide what it wants to be about and a series of poorly drawn characters in a world that feels half-cooked. I found it really rather boring, actually. The visuals were distracting more than they were impressive, it was much too long and the whole exercise was laden with cliche.

  4. #4
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    I wish I had the time and patience to be able to do this. I don't think I've seen a combined 10 new movies from 2016-2018, let alone being able to see 10 new movies in a single year. I'll be keeping up with this thread, though, so I know what I need to check out come 2021 or so.

  5. #5
    Author of 101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die Samuel 'Plan's Avatar
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    The thread's always here if anyone else, including yourself meandi, do get to a 10-film or more point! Saw another couple this weekend so figured I'd drop another update - new entries at 10 and 1!

    Look forward to it Gooner! No other uptake yet I see, but I've seen a couple more films - Alita: Battle Angel and All is True. So time for an update!

    1. A Private War - saw this one last night and while I'd been looking forward to it I didn't quite expect it to leave as much of an impression on me as it did. It's not so much gritty as it is just hard and unflinching. Rosamund Pike is spectacular in it and the way it shows the realities and impact of modern warfare is so powerful, because it does it with near photo-realistic restraint. I loved it.

    2. Green Book - tremendous film, I can understand why some have criticised it but I thought the two central performances and that relationship between their characters was really delightful and made it so infinitely watchable. I also thought it was confident in challenging the themes it deals with.

    3. Burning - saw this just last night and it's a tremendously dense, mercurial film with a sinister edge to it that's strangely intoxicating. It pulls you into this delirious atmosphere where you can't be sure of whether people are who they say they are or whether things are what they seem.

    4. Beautiful Boy - a lot of people have been condemning this, especially because of its use of music, but honestly I thought it was fantastic. The story is performed in a deeply affecting way and I'm a huge fan of Timotheé Chalamet, who puts in a central performance almost on par with his effort in Call Me By Your Name. Deeply moving.

    5. Destroyer - not quite the powerhouse I was anticipating, but Nicole Kidman is unrecognisable and pretty damn excellent. It's also got a really cool twist in it that totally took me by surprise, to the point of having me leaning forwards in my seat!

    6. All is True - it's a quaint and curious little film about the later days of William Shakespeare, but thanks to its inflections of humour and the relative restraint of its more powerfully emotional scenes I actually really ended up liking it. Quite a lot, thinking about it. Kenneth Branagh and Ian McKellen stand out from a raft of excellent performances.

    7. Stan & Ollie - quietly charming, is how I would describe it. It felt a little straight-forward with no real peak in the drama to push it to that next level for me, but the the way they weaved in comic routines as if they'd come straight out of one of the classic Laurel and Hardy films was ingenious. More sterling performances too.

    8. Vice - a little disappointed with it, as I didn't realise it was Adam McKay, so finding it executed in a manner very similar of The Big Short took me by surprise. Was compelling for certain, but everything felt like it was trying a little too hard to really drive its nihilistic viewpoint home.

    9. Can You Ever Forgive Me? - like Stan & Ollie, it's a pretty straight-forward film really, but it lacks the same great performances that gave Stan & Ollie its charm. I know it's gotten some awards buzz and I'm honestly unsure why. I found it to be little more than solid.

    10. If Beale Street Could Talk - like Mary, Queen of Scots this is one I went into really looking forward to seeing only to emerge bitterly disappointed. The first ten minutes are outrageously good, but then it's like the film forgets what made them good and starts laying foundations for a dozen more interesting films that then never take shape. Nothing seems to progress and its underlying point is made weakly for it. A shame.


    UNRANKED

    Alita: Battle Angel - an ill disciplined mess with a plot that can't decide what it wants to be about and a series of poorly drawn characters in a world that feels half-cooked. I found it really rather boring, actually. The visuals were distracting more than they were impressive, it was much too long and the whole exercise was laden with cliche.

    Glass - a fun new take on the comic book movie, but nowhere near the league of its Unbreakable originator. A couple of twists - one better than the other - aren't able to get it past that same issue every Shyamalan film has (perhaps except Unbreakable): he's just not a very good writer.

    Mary, Queen of Scots - had high hopes and they were dashed in pretty almighty fashion. Drier than stale bread, I thought the entire thing just fell flat. Characterisation was handled poorly in the script I felt, and it built to a big scene that then just...sort of...happened. "Eh," was how I felt coming out, having been acutely aware of its two hour run-time.

  6. #6
    Author of 101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die Samuel 'Plan's Avatar
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    The thread's always here if anyone else, including yourself meandi, do get to a 10-film or more point! Saw another couple this weekend so figured I'd drop another update - new entries at 10 and 1!

    Look forward to it Gooner! No other uptake yet I see, but I've seen a couple more films - Alita: Battle Angel and All is True. So time for an update!

    1. A Private War - saw this one last night and while I'd been looking forward to it I didn't quite expect it to leave as much of an impression on me as it did. It's not so much gritty as it is just hard and unflinching. Rosamund Pike is spectacular in it and the way it shows the realities and impact of modern warfare is so powerful, because it does it with near photo-realistic restraint. I loved it.

    2. Green Book - tremendous film, I can understand why some have criticised it but I thought the two central performances and that relationship between their characters was really delightful and made it so infinitely watchable. I also thought it was confident in challenging the themes it deals with.

    3. Burning - saw this just last night and it's a tremendously dense, mercurial film with a sinister edge to it that's strangely intoxicating. It pulls you into this delirious atmosphere where you can't be sure of whether people are who they say they are or whether things are what they seem.

    4. On the Basis of Sex - got to this one a couple of weeks ago and I really enjoyed it. Hard to think it'll be this high once the calendar really starts to unfold, but it was uplifting in a punch-the-air kind of way, I felt, if a little bit of a let down in the climactic court room scene that felt a little rushed. Not too much to moan about though, as it was more of a character study anyway.

    5. Beautiful Boy - a lot of people have been condemning this, especially because of its use of music, but honestly I thought it was fantastic. The story is performed in a deeply affecting way and I'm a huge fan of Timotheé Chalamet, who puts in a central performance almost on par with his effort in Call Me By Your Name. Deeply moving.

    6. Destroyer - not quite the powerhouse I was anticipating, but Nicole Kidman is unrecognisable and pretty damn excellent. It's also got a really cool twist in it that totally took me by surprise, to the point of having me leaning forwards in my seat!

    7. All is True - it's a quaint and curious little film about the later days of William Shakespeare, but thanks to its inflections of humour and the relative restraint of its more powerfully emotional scenes I actually really ended up liking it. Quite a lot, thinking about it. Kenneth Branagh and Ian McKellen stand out from a raft of excellent performances.

    8. Stan & Ollie - quietly charming, is how I would describe it. It felt a little straight-forward with no real peak in the drama to push it to that next level for me, but the the way they weaved in comic routines as if they'd come straight out of one of the classic Laurel and Hardy films was ingenious. More sterling performances too.

    9. Instant Family - one I managed to sneak in unexpectedly last night, I was pleasantly surprised by it. Sure it was a bit cheesy and hammy and, at times, AWFULLY acted by the adult leads, but it made me a chuckle a handful of times and the more dramatic moments were executed well. I left feeling somewhat uplifted.

    10. Fighting With My Family - a strange experience for a wrestling fan, but one I'm glad I took the time to take in. Not the movie I wanted as a wrestling fan or as a film goer, and never hits the lofty heights of the best British comedy dramas, but it's got one very compelling character arc, some excellent performances and a bunch of laugh out loud moments.

    UNRANKED

    Alita: Battle Angel - an ill disciplined mess with a plot that can't decide what it wants to be about and a series of poorly drawn characters in a world that feels half-cooked. I found it really rather boring, actually. The visuals were distracting more than they were impressive, it was much too long and the whole exercise was laden with cliche.

    Can You Ever Forgive Me? - like Stan & Ollie, it's a pretty straight-forward film really, but it lacks the same great performances that gave Stan & Ollie its charm. I know it's gotten some awards buzz and I'm honestly unsure why. I found it to be little more than solid.

    Captain Marvel - generic Marvel film is generic Marvel film. Nothing much else to say on it, honestly!

    Cold Pursuit - a real odd one, that seems to enjoy being a now cliche Liam Neeson action vehicle (no pun intended) while being joyous in keeping its tongue firmly in cheek and sort of winking at the ridiculousness of this latter-day Neeson wave of action flicks. It was noticably overlong, at times mildly entertaining, but generally...just odd.

    Glass - a fun new take on the comic book movie, but nowhere near the league of its Unbreakable originator. A couple of twists - one better than the other - aren't able to get it past that same issue every Shyamalan film has (perhaps except Unbreakable): he's just not a very good writer.

    If Beale Street Could Talk - like Mary, Queen of Scots this is one I went into really looking forward to seeing only to emerge bitterly disappointed. The first ten minutes are outrageously good, but then it's like the film forgets what made them good and starts laying foundations for a dozen more interesting films that then never take shape. Nothing seems to progress and its underlying point is made weakly for it. A shame.

    Mary, Queen of Scots - had high hopes and they were dashed in pretty almighty fashion. Drier than stale bread, I thought the entire thing just fell flat. Characterisation was handled poorly in the script I felt, and it built to a big scene that then just...sort of...happened. "Eh," was how I felt coming out, having been acutely aware of its two hour run-time.

    Vice - a little disappointed with it, as I didn't realise it was Adam McKay, so finding it executed in a manner very similar of The Big Short took me by surprise. Was compelling for certain, but everything felt like it was trying a little too hard to really drive its nihilistic viewpoint home.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    It's dawned on me that I have watched 10 previously un-watched films this year, but they weren't all released in 2019 (so, new films to me, but not new in and of itself). Perhaps I could start with those? Just don't want to destroy the purpose of the thread!

    EDIT: I'm just going to go ahead and do this. I'll ask for forgiveness if need be!

    1. A Quiet Place (2018). Best horror film I've seen in years, superbly acted and a genuinely scary proposition. Heard there's a sequel out, which should be awesome.

    2. The Big Short (2015). Really liked this, a great cast and a really interesting view into the 2008 economic crash. Steve Carrell steals the show.

    3. Captain Marvel (2019). Nice origin story, well structured, if perhaps a few years too late. Felt weird watching an origin story after Infinity War.

    4. Bohemian Rhapsody (2018). The film itself is fine, if perhaps a little safe. But Rami Malek deserves his Oscar for a fantastic performance as Freddie Mercury.

    5. Gone Girl (2014). I saw the big twist coming, but it was still effective. It's quite a tricky film to watch as roles are reversed unexpectedly (though I did see it coming) and it's hard to come to a conclusion on how I felt. Intrigued, if not perhaps enamoured by it.

    6. The Imitation Game (2014). Film about Alan Turing, someone I studied about at Uni. It's an OK film, though I think it misses out a lot on certain aspects of his life.

    7. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011). I had heard great things about this, but was left very disappointed. Didn't grab me at all and I found the plot confusing. The acting was fine though.

    8. Need For Speed (2014). Fun for what it was, but not very memorable. Car scenes were a little below Fast and Furious' level, though that also made them more realistic I guess.

    9. Fargo (1996). Another film that disappointed me. It had a Tarantino feel to it, but I just didn't get into it at all. I also could get over the amount of 'Oh Yeah' dialog that took place.

    10. Circle (2015). Interesting premise, and a nice twist ending. But very much a B movie at best.
    Last edited by Gooner; 04-03-2019 at 11:37 AM.


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  8. #8
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    Seen a couple more films since, so updating this. As a reminder, my list is of films I have never seen before, regardless of if they were released this year or not. All films I have seen after January 1st 2019.

    1. Avengers: Endgame. Yes, it's not perfect, but I have not marked out for a film as much as this one since Star Wars Episode 7 or The Dark Knight. A film that justifies watching the proceeding 20-odd films before it is incredibly satisfying.

    2. A Quiet Place (2018). Best horror film I've seen in years, superbly acted and a genuinely scary proposition. Heard there's a sequel out, which should be awesome.

    3. The Big Short (2015). Really liked this, a great cast and a really interesting view into the 2008 economic crash. Steve Carrell steals the show.

    4. The Devil Wears Prada. I really enjoyed this, surprisingly. Meryl Streep is brilliant and the remaining cast play their part well. My mother worked in the fashion industry so she was able to pick apart certain aspects, but for a film supposedly based on Anna Wintour, it's a fascinating story. The less said about the love interest, however, the better.

    5. Bohemian Rhapsody (2018). The film itself is fine, if perhaps a little safe. But Rami Malek deserves his Oscar for a fantastic performance as Freddie Mercury.

    6. Gone Girl (2014). I saw the big twist coming, but it was still effective. It's quite a tricky film to watch as roles are reversed unexpectedly (though I did see it coming) and it's hard to come to a conclusion on how I felt. Intrigued, if not perhaps enamoured by it.

    7. Captain Marvel (2019). Nice origin story, well structured, if perhaps a few years too late. Felt weird watching an origin story after Infinity War. I've bumped this down a couple of places due to events in Avengers: Endgame, as it has slightly changed my perception of this film.

    8. The Imitation Game (2014). Film about Alan Turing, someone I studied about at Uni. It's an OK film, though I think it misses out a lot on certain aspects of his life.

    9. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011). I had heard great things about this, but was left very disappointed. Didn't grab me at all and I found the plot confusing. The acting was fine though.

    10. Need For Speed (2014). Fun for what it was, but not very memorable. Car scenes were a little below Fast and Furious' level, though that also made them more realistic I guess.


    Unranked:

    Fargo (1996). Another film that disappointed me. It had a Tarantino feel to it, but I just didn't get into it at all. I also could get over the amount of 'Oh Yeah' dialog that took place.

    Circle (2015). Interesting premise, and a nice twist ending. But very much a B movie at best.


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  9. #9
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    The thing with Fargo, as with all Coen Brothers films... you either love them or you hate them. All of their movies are weird and eclectic and... yeah. For instance, Burn After Reading is comedy genius in my opinion, and I absolutely love it. Chick I dated for a while said it was one of the dumbest movies she’s ever seen and couldn’t stand it.

  10. #10
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    A Quiet Place 2: the release date as of now is set for May 2020.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by meandi View Post
    The thing with Fargo, as with all Coen Brothers films... you either love them or you hate them. All of their movies are weird and eclectic and... yeah. For instance, Burn After Reading is comedy genius in my opinion, and I absolutely love it. Chick I dated for a while said it was one of the dumbest movies she’s ever seen and couldn’t stand it.
    I agree, I could just about tell that it gave a vibe of 'other people will love this' but I was not one of them.

    Haven't seen Burn After Reading for ages, but I remember also not particularly liking it, I must say.

    Next on my list is probably 'It Follows' followed by 'Tag'. Will update soon!


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  12. #12
    Author of 101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die Samuel 'Plan's Avatar
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    Great to see some others jump on this! Planning a major update sometime soon. I think I'm up to around 30-something now though, so it'll be a big post lol.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    New update, two more added. I said I would watch Tag and It Follows, however I decided instead to start the DCEU movies. I had already watched Man Of Steel therefore it shall not be part of the list (but fyi, I preferred it to the two following it).

    As a reminder, my list is of films I have never seen before, regardless of if they were released this year or not. All films I have seen after January 1st 2019.

    1. Avengers: Endgame (2019). Yes, it's not perfect, but I have not marked out for a film as much as this one since Star Wars Episode 7 or The Dark Knight. A film that justifies watching the proceeding 20-odd films before it is incredibly satisfying.

    2. A Quiet Place (2018). Best horror film I've seen in years, superbly acted and a genuinely scary proposition. Heard there's a sequel out, which should be awesome.

    3. The Big Short (2015). Really liked this, a great cast and a really interesting view into the 2008 economic crash. Steve Carrell steals the show.

    4. The Devil Wears Prada (2006). I really enjoyed this, surprisingly. Meryl Streep is brilliant and the remaining cast play their part well. My mother worked in the fashion industry so she was able to pick apart certain aspects, but for a film supposedly based on Anna Wintour, it's a fascinating story. The less said about the love interest, however, the better.

    5. Bohemian Rhapsody (2018). The film itself is fine, if perhaps a little safe. But Rami Malek deserves his Oscar for a fantastic performance as Freddie Mercury.

    6. Gone Girl (2014). I saw the big twist coming, but it was still effective. It's quite a tricky film to watch as roles are reversed unexpectedly (though I did see it coming) and it's hard to come to a conclusion on how I felt. Intrigued, if not perhaps enamoured by it.

    7. Captain Marvel (2019). Nice origin story, well structured, if perhaps a few years too late. Felt weird watching an origin story after Infinity War. I've bumped this down a couple of places due to events in Avengers: Endgame, as it has slightly changed my perception of this film.

    8. The Imitation Game (2014). Film about Alan Turing, someone I studied about at Uni. It's an OK film, though I think it misses out a lot on certain aspects of his life.

    9. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011). I had heard great things about this, but was left very disappointed. Didn't grab me at all and I found the plot confusing. The acting was fine though.

    10. Batman v Superman: Dawn Of Justice (2016). I'm still a little unsure how I feel about this. Some things I adored (Wonder Woman, Alfred, dark tone...), some I loathed (Lex, Doomsday, killings, leaps of faith in terms of credibility, story...). Very weird film to have an opinion on, but I came out of it thinking that I didn't like it. Affleck was good as an 'older' Batman, better than expected. But I think this is the film that convinced me that, after only two films, the DCEU is not on the right track. And is it just me or is every character, good or bad, really unlikable?

    Unranked:

    Need For Speed (2014). Fun for what it was, but not very memorable. Car scenes were a little below Fast and Furious' level, though that also made them more realistic I guess.

    Suicide Squad (2016). I must say I hated this. I really wanted to like it from the trailers, but for me this was just a total mess, loads of pacing issues, really unlikeable characters and missed opportunities. The focus is clearly on Deadshot and Harley, with the rest of the squad just bit part players (seriously, Captain Boomerang?!), the most interesting character, the Joker, is a side character, the main mission is just quite honestly boring... Yeah, didn't like it.

    Fargo (1996). Another film that disappointed me. It had a Tarantino feel to it, but I just didn't get into it at all. I also could get over the amount of 'Oh Yeah' dialog that took place.

    Circle (2015). Interesting premise, and a nice twist ending. But very much a B movie at best.


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  14. #14
    Member #25 SirSam's Avatar
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    Love that you gave The Big Short a callout. I work in banking and got everyone in my branch to watch it. Freakin' fantastic film that boils down complex financial stuff to really digestible and even entertaining bits. Great way to present the story.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    Absolutely; to be honest I'd always been intrigued by the crash. Being 18 at the time, I didn't understand it when it happened, even though I have and will feel the effects of it for years to come.

    The film itself is a great way of explaining it (with minor creative changes) but it wouldn't have worked without the stellar cast.


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  16. #16
    Author of 101 WWE Matches To See Before You Die Samuel 'Plan's Avatar
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    Awww man. Another person who didn't like BvS! I adore that film, but am starting to think I'm the only one! If you dug Wonder Woman in it you might really enjoy her solo movie so I'd recommend that if you haven't seen it. Aquaman was bizarre but they leaned into it enough they got away with it for the most part I think. Shazam was all kinds of straight-up awesome though. Would love to hear your thoughts on any of these Gooner!

    Need to seriously update my own list. I'm like, 15 behind or something stupid.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Gooner's Avatar
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    May 2018
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    Yeah, they'll probably be next on my list (I have OCD about finishing things through before moving on to the next thing. As you could imagine, watching all Marvel films back to back before Endgame was a chore!).

    Yeah BvS... I really wanted to like it, but too many creative decisions went against what I like.


    I've tried taking up column writing, check it out here!

    Words from a Gooner #2: 7 Treatments for Wrestlemania Fever

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